45' big/accurate "framing square" - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 18 Old 04-27-2016, 02:05 PM Thread Starter
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45' big/accurate "framing square"

does such a thing as a 45 degree "framing square" similar to the completely normal carpenter framing square exist?

the longer the legs the better "accuracy" one gets - I'm not entirely satisfied with the "fixed notches" of various 'gauges' / set-ups - but I've not ever seen a steel / alum "45 degree square"
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post #2 of 18 Old 04-27-2016, 02:25 PM
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big enuf?


http://www.amazon.com/CH-Hanson-Squa.../dp/B00004TKDP


or use the big 12


http://www.swansontoolco.com/product...re-layout-bar/

Last edited by TimPa; 04-27-2016 at 02:30 PM.
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post #3 of 18 Old 04-27-2016, 03:53 PM Thread Starter
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ooooh - that Hanson batch is nice!

I need to go gander about whether the 16" or 3-4-5' is the best choice.
hmmm, the 3-4-5 isn't a 45 degree.

thanks for the leads!
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post #4 of 18 Old 04-27-2016, 11:26 PM
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post #5 of 18 Old 04-28-2016, 07:58 AM
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The prices are certainly big enough. I've always just measured off a 45 and marked a line.
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post #6 of 18 Old 04-28-2016, 08:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomCT2 View Post
ooooh - that Hanson batch is nice!

I need to go gander about whether the 16" or 3-4-5' is the best choice.
hmmm, the 3-4-5 isn't a 45 degree.

thanks for the leads!

right - sorry I picked the wrong one to show.
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post #7 of 18 Old 04-28-2016, 08:57 AM
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Ahh... make your own

Quote:
Originally Posted by TomCT2 View Post
ooooh - that Hanson batch is nice!

I need to go gander about whether the 16" or 3-4-5' is the best choice.
hmmm, the 3-4-5 isn't a 45 degree.

thanks for the leads!
A 45 degree will have equal length short legs. The long leg will be 1.414 times the short length, unless I forgot HS trig.


You can use 1/8" X 1" aluminum bar/flat from the box store. You can use pop rivets to hold them together.
Check for 90 degrees using the "mark and flip" method.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #8 of 18 Old 04-28-2016, 09:00 AM Thread Starter
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I saw that 4 ft one - that might be a smidge bigger than practical in my shop (g)
there's also a 45 with 16 inch legs - that will work.

was yakking with a machine shop guy - he's got some leftover alum plate and mega-sized CNC machines - he may be able to whack one out 'just the right size'

there's also a 45 with 16 inch legs - that will work.
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post #9 of 18 Old 04-28-2016, 10:31 AM
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A carpenter's framing square can be held on matching numbers on both legs to give you 45 degrees.
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post #10 of 18 Old 04-28-2016, 11:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammer1 View Post
A carpenter's framing square can be held on matching numbers on both legs to give you 45 degrees.
It is amazing how versatile that tool is once you get to know it.
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Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #11 of 18 Old 05-01-2016, 04:32 AM
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Good idea to use a framing square! I sold cabinetry for 2-1/2 years and never saw one at a jobsite! Naturally, the workmanship reflected the "guess-and-by-golly" approach to crafting a house.

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
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post #12 of 18 Old 05-01-2016, 09:50 AM Thread Starter
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the reason you don't see them used that way in cabinetry:

count up the number of hands and fingers required to hold it accurately / perfectly in place and also draw/trace/sketch/mark a line/point/etc.

the theory is sound and works where accuracy is not critical - a 1/8 gap in a birds beak is not going to be noticed or matter much. a 1/8 gap in a mitered frame corner - yeah, that'll leave a comment.

I have 3 framing squares, I am fluent in geometry, I have my old CRC book with tables and tables of geometric ratios, but I find a scientific calculator easier to use in the shop.

what I need is a lightweight quick way to double check my set ups, using one person and two hands.
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post #13 of 18 Old 05-01-2016, 10:10 AM
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I use this occasionally..

This is a 90 angle, with flat sides, so it won't require 3 hands to use. If it needs to be clamped, that's easy also.

Make one from hard wood, or have a metal one fabricated, a pair would be better:




The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #14 of 18 Old 05-02-2016, 02:50 PM
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Maybe I'm not fully understanding your answer,TomCT2. What I meant is that I never saw a carpenter use a square. Saw one house where the closet trim at the bottom was about two inches from the outside wall. At the top of the trim, it was about 5 inches from the outside wall. Three inches in seven feet? Very noticeable! And this was a house that would have sold over $250K here, ten years ago.

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
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post #15 of 18 Old 05-03-2016, 08:50 AM Thread Starter
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Pineknot - today's approach of assembling factory build panels is a lot different than ye'olde stick build routine. plumb bobs / levels / corner to corner measures are the usual today. there's no field cuts on pre-fab roof trusses - a stair come pre-cut/pre-assembled-drop in-place&nail - etc etc.

for the rough / framing carpenter there's not much old style detail left. fortunately - because the pre-fab stuff is typically way more accurate than field work. finish carpenters are more apt to be using a framing square now-a-days.

regardless, my point was simply that holding / using / marking / whatever - angles with a carpenter square (there's usually a table inscribed, you can do a lot more than 90' & 45' with them....) is ungainly. and, on short lengths, not especially accurate.

...3 inches in 7 feet.... seen some of that kind - substance abuse . . . guys that couldn't even remember if they worked on the site yesterday . . .
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post #16 of 18 Old 05-04-2016, 06:46 AM
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Maybe substance abuse but my observation is the attitude: Throw it together, forget quality, and get on to the next job so we can make more $$$$$. I was at jobsites at all stages of building and, again, never saw any carpenter use a square. Never even saw one at a jobsite.

Quality: I was told of a local builder who was found to staple cardboard to the walls. He had run a string along the wall and was stapling cardboard in the low places. When asked why, he stated that this would make the sheet rock straight where the backsplash of the countertops would be and prevent big gaps between the wall and backsplash. That impressed me!

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
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post #17 of 18 Old 05-04-2016, 10:37 AM
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When you use a framing square, you also use the stair gauge buttons. The accuracy only depends on the user. For 45s, a known 45 reference square can be used to help set up the buttons. Set them on the inside edges of the square, then you will be able to use it right up to the edge of the work.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Empire-3-...-105/100162901
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post #18 of 18 Old 05-04-2016, 10:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pineknot_86 View Post
Maybe substance abuse but my observation is the attitude: Throw it together, forget quality, and get on to the next job so we can make more $$$$$. I was at jobsites at all stages of building and, again, never saw any carpenter use a square. Never even saw one at a jobsite.
wow. around here (rural) we rely on repeat business, satisfied customers calling us back for more work. we would be out of business in short order.
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