Whatís In Your First Aid Kit? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

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post #1 of 12 Old 07-11-2016, 09:24 PM Thread Starter
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Whatís In Your First Aid Kit?



As much as we try to avoid them, accidents happen. Itís easy to laugh off the possibility of serious accidents in the wood shop, boasting that your first aid kit is just a roll of duct tape and some paper towels. If something does go wrong in your shop, though, itís important to have the means at hand to take care of any injuries that might occur. Safety is no accident and a big part of safety is being prepared for just about anything.

This means getting a well-stocked first aid kit if you donít already have one. While a general off-the-shelf first aid kit is a good starting point, there are some situations that can arise in a busy wood shop that require emergency-level care. Here are a few additional items to include in a first aid kit Ė just in case you need them.

Bandages

Almost any pre-packed first aid kit is going to contain several types of adhesive bandages; thereís a good reason for that. Youíre more likely to need a Band-Aid than just about anything else in your kit Ė but they arenít the only bandages to have on hand. Fingertip and knuckle bandages, butterfly bandages, gauze pads and both gauze and non-adhesive bandage wraps are also very useful in the shop. Add in some medical tape to help hold gauze bandages in place.

Disinfectants

Iodine solutions and antibiotic first aid creams are very useful in case of cuts, scrapes and splinters. A bottle of rubbing alcohol is also useful, even if you have the other disinfectants in your kit. While weíre on the subject of germs, disposable gloves are also an important addition.

Tools

Scissors and a decent-quality knife are both important tools to have in your first aid kit. Tweezers are also a must, since splinters are a major issue in wood shops; you also might consider keeping a pill bottle or other small container holding needles in rubbing alcohol to aid in splinter removal. A small hand mirror can be useful in case you need to inspect your eye, face or other hard-to-see area.

Eyes and Lungs

There are a lot of materials in a wood shop capable of irritating your eyes and lungs. Having a first aid kit equipped to deal with these problems is essential. Keep an in-date eye wash solution in your kit, especially if you donít have running water in your shop. If you have asthma or other respiratory problems, keep a spare asthma inhaler in your kit Ė wood dusts and chemicals can trigger an asthma attack.

Bruises and Broken Bones

Broken fingers is a common injury in wood shops Ė usually caused by hammers or nail guns. Even if impacts donít break bones, they can cause really nasty bruises and plenty of pain. Cold compresses (the kind that are chemical activated, as opposed to ice packs) are useful for these types of injuries, as is a bottle of ibuprofen or aspirin (dependent on any allergies). Finger splints and similar braces can also help with impact injuries.

Bleeding and Amputation

While uncommon, major lacerations and even the amputation of fingers or other parts of the body can occur in the shop. Several sterile cloths, large enough to wrap around the thickest part of your thigh or larger, are very useful in case itís necessary to apply pressure to a bleeding wound. Coagulant powder (available over the counter) will help stop heavy bleeding. Clean plastic zip-bags are also important in case of an amputation; an amputated part must be kept iced and sterile for possible re-attachment.

Rotation and Restocking

Once you have a first aid kit, itís your responsibility to keep it stocked and updated. Donít take tools out of it for non-medical uses and replace any depleted items at the earliest opportunity. Go through everything in the kit every few months, checking expiration dates and replacing outdated items. While it may seem unnecessary to keep your first aid kit so well stocked, youíll be grateful for it if you ever have need of any of these items.

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post #2 of 12 Old 07-11-2016, 11:21 PM
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Great advice. Unfortunately, I won't be able to comply with most of those items.

"Once you have a first aid kit, itís your responsibility to keep it stocked and updated."

In my shop, I won't even be able to find it after a while, let alone ensure it's updated.
I have plenty of rags lying around, that will do until the ET's arrive. I don't have a shop, just my garage at the moment, so Wife will hear me if I need emergency help.

If anything major, life threatening, happens ... I'll just let it bleed out, I've lived a full life so far.
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post #3 of 12 Old 07-11-2016, 11:39 PM
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Whats in my first aid kit... a lot of bloody wrappers, courtesy of the last time i sliced open a finger. Probably should get that cleaned out and restocked at some point..

In all seriousness though, i dont really bother with an actual first aid kit. Any small nicks or cuts in the shop are either fixed with superglue or duct tape, i dont have the patience to mess about with a bandaid. I got stuff to build. Anything larger, im still more likely to go for the duct tape, because if i just hacked off a finger im not going to bother locating the first aid kit and digging out a tourniquet

I need cheaper hobby
etsy.com/shop/projectepicfail
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post #4 of 12 Old 07-12-2016, 12:14 AM
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Not completely sure. I have purchased first aid kits for both our vehicles, boat, motor home, travel trailer, garage/shop and one for the house. Not all were purchased at the same time but all are middle of the road models in the range of 25 to 30 bucks cost each. As far as I know none have been used except the one in the house for band aids which have been replenished several times.

I also have fire extinguishers for every place mentioned above with a couple each in the house and garage/shop placed in accessible/strategic locations.
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post #5 of 12 Old 07-12-2016, 07:41 AM
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+1 on the fire extinguishers. At least one in every room of the house.
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post #6 of 12 Old 07-15-2016, 10:53 AM
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The number one item in my first aid kit is a phone to call 911.. I'm pretty lucky in that I don't bleed easily. When I sliced open my hand last winter the bleeding had already stopped before I made it into the house even though it required 5 stitches. It probably sounds strange, but I usually dip open wounds in laquer thinner. It disinfects and helps stop bleeding quick. It burns like hell,but works.

I figured it's time to change my signature so hold your breath. This is it.
Impressive, huh?
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post #7 of 12 Old 07-15-2016, 10:57 AM
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I think the first aid kit I have is probably 10 years old and needs to be thrown away. All I ever use is bandaids.
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post #8 of 12 Old 07-15-2016, 10:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodworkingTalk View Post


As much as we try to avoid them, accidents happen. Itís easy to laugh off the possibility of serious accidents in the wood shop, boasting that your first aid kit is just a roll of duct tape and some paper towels. If something does go wrong in your shop, though, itís important to have the means at hand to take care of any injuries that might occur. Safety is no accident and a big part of safety is being prepared for just about anything.

This means getting a well-stocked first aid kit if you donít already have one. While a general off-the-shelf first aid kit is a good starting point, there are some situations that can arise in a busy wood shop that require emergency-level care. Here are a few additional items to include in a first aid kit Ė just in case you need them.

Bandages

Almost any pre-packed first aid kit is going to contain several types of adhesive bandages; thereís a good reason for that. Youíre more likely to need a Band-Aid than just about anything else in your kit Ė but they arenít the only bandages to have on hand. Fingertip and knuckle bandages, butterfly bandages, gauze pads and both gauze and non-adhesive bandage wraps are also very useful in the shop. Add in some medical tape to help hold gauze bandages in place.

Disinfectants

Iodine solutions and antibiotic first aid creams are very useful in case of cuts, scrapes and splinters. A bottle of rubbing alcohol is also useful, even if you have the other disinfectants in your kit. While weíre on the subject of germs, disposable gloves are also an important addition.

Tools

Scissors and a decent-quality knife are both important tools to have in your first aid kit. Tweezers are also a must, since splinters are a major issue in wood shops; you also might consider keeping a pill bottle or other small container holding needles in rubbing alcohol to aid in splinter removal. A small hand mirror can be useful in case you need to inspect your eye, face or other hard-to-see area.

Eyes and Lungs

There are a lot of materials in a wood shop capable of irritating your eyes and lungs. Having a first aid kit equipped to deal with these problems is essential. Keep an in-date eye wash solution in your kit, especially if you donít have running water in your shop. If you have asthma or other respiratory problems, keep a spare asthma inhaler in your kit Ė wood dusts and chemicals can trigger an asthma attack.

Bruises and Broken Bones

Broken fingers is a common injury in wood shops Ė usually caused by hammers or nail guns. Even if impacts donít break bones, they can cause really nasty bruises and plenty of pain. Cold compresses (the kind that are chemical activated, as opposed to ice packs) are useful for these types of injuries, as is a bottle of ibuprofen or aspirin (dependent on any allergies). Finger splints and similar braces can also help with impact injuries.

Bleeding and Amputation

While uncommon, major lacerations and even the amputation of fingers or other parts of the body can occur in the shop. Several sterile cloths, large enough to wrap around the thickest part of your thigh or larger, are very useful in case itís necessary to apply pressure to a bleeding wound. Coagulant powder (available over the counter) will help stop heavy bleeding. Clean plastic zip-bags are also important in case of an amputation; an amputated part must be kept iced and sterile for possible re-attachment.

Rotation and Restocking

Once you have a first aid kit, itís your responsibility to keep it stocked and updated. Donít take tools out of it for non-medical uses and replace any depleted items at the earliest opportunity. Go through everything in the kit every few months, checking expiration dates and replacing outdated items. While it may seem unnecessary to keep your first aid kit so well stocked, youíll be grateful for it if you ever have need of any of these items.
You know...if you're amputating yourself in your shop I'm thinking that you probably ought to find a new hobby or line of work. At minimum at least take off the blindfold while working.

I figured it's time to change my signature so hold your breath. This is it.
Impressive, huh?
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post #9 of 12 Old 07-15-2016, 09:04 PM
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Superglue and or tape here also.............can't stand the sight of my own blood .........dripping on my nice wood.
If it dripped any where else I'd be OK with it .

Woodworking does knot ever make me board.
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post #10 of 12 Old 07-17-2016, 02:07 PM
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I got napkens,tape and a razer for my splinters or neck.
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post #11 of 12 Old 07-20-2016, 05:09 AM
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Tweezers to get those splinters out and surgical tape to wrap up any cuts good and tight!
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post #12 of 12 Old 07-30-2016, 01:58 PM
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When I'm done cussing...I make my way to a sink and rinse and dry minor cuts. I try my best to avoid any major injuries. "Safety First".
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