How Do You Stack Lumber? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

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post #1 of 13 Old 04-25-2016, 06:44 AM Thread Starter
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How Do You Stack Lumber?



How do you stack lumber? Horizontally? Vertically?

Why?

Credit: Topic provided by @Tony B.

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post #2 of 13 Old 04-25-2016, 07:10 AM
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Simply I stack and sticker any wet or non dried wood so air can blow around them.
Dried slabs, below 10% moisture content, I don't bother with stickers.
All horizontal and in a shelving unit inside of a stone room with adequate ventilation.
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post #3 of 13 Old 04-25-2016, 08:46 AM
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Vertically to save space. All my lumber is purchased kiln dried.
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post #4 of 13 Old 04-25-2016, 08:53 AM
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Vertical until I cut it for guitar backs, sides, and tops and then stickered horizontally.

David

Nothing to do with woodworking at all, just our music at church (I'm the guy with the Koa Takamine) - Airline Baptist BC Songs
Romans 3:23
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post #5 of 13 Old 04-25-2016, 08:57 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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I use both

For air drying, I use 1" stkickers between the boards which are also 1" thick. After air drying for 2 years minimum, I bring them inside to acclimate to the shop environment, usually around 55 degrees or warmer and low humidity.
In the shop I store them vertically, by tallest in the rear to shortest in the front. That way I can see all my lengths and get just the right one for the project. I sort bt species and label the ends with Red Oak, Wht Oak, Quartersawn, Maple, Cherrry, Walnut, Ash, etc. and then the exotics which are easy to discern, so no label is needed.
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specfic. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo
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post #6 of 13 Old 04-25-2016, 09:10 AM
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Except for my first shop in a spare bedroom, all of my other shops were in rental locations. At every rental location, I always used vertical storage. Two shops had both vertical and horizontal storage and thatís because I had forklifts in the shop to handle the plywood.
Why I choose vertical storage:
1.) The boards are always flat against the rack and so no chance of warping or twisting from not laying flat. Whenever I move boards around, solid lumber or plywood, I just kick the bottom of the stack to ensure all is flat against each other and the rack.
2). I can better see what I have
3). It is much easier and faster to move a board in the vertical position than in a horizontal lifting and moving.
4). Plywood moving is a snap. Just back up to a sheet of plywood and tilt it forward till it leans on your back. Then barely bend you knees. Then spread your arms behind you and grab the ply at a comfortable low angle and stand up straight and lift the plywood. Now you can comfortably walk and carry at the same time.
Here comes the comical part. I suggest you do this in privacy: Walk the board up to your table saw then slowly bend forward and down to your knees until the plywood is making contact with the table saw. hen crawl out from under the plywood. Turn the table saw on, lift the ply from the other end and run through the saw.
Looking at the photos, you can see that the rack slopes slightly backwards and is a few inches off the floor. It was made entirely of MDF. The arms at the ends of the lumber rack were made of 1x4 pine. I wouldnít trust MDF to handle the stresses on the sides from banging the boards around. The lumber racks can be added to at any time. The framework truss behind the face-boards were glued and screwed together, and the face boards themselves were simply screwed to the trussís. Easy assembly and disassembly if you decide to move them.
This one here was in a 12 X 32 Mini-storage building. the electricity was poor at best, so I had to buy a generator for the air compressor. This started out as my hobby shop. I would say that about half the units were rented out to businesses. Some were active shops such as cabinet making, machine shop, awnings, etc.
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post #7 of 13 Old 04-25-2016, 12:44 PM
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Every which way for carving wood:
Flat on the floor under the benches. Vertical in the corners and along the walls. Log pieces stack like firewood.
Fresh shake blocks outdoors on top of the dog house to keep it from blowing away.
Crude jigs to hold wood for rough-out carving get left outdoors with freight pallets.
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post #8 of 13 Old 04-28-2016, 05:34 AM
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Good idea Tony..That'll be on my list sometime soon after I get the old shelving and bench removed. Looks like a great space saver. I'm really limited on floor space, but ok on wall space if that makes any sense..

I figured it's time to change my signature so hold your breath. This is it.
Impressive, huh?
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post #9 of 13 Old 04-28-2016, 07:53 AM
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AllPurpose

It makes perfect sense to me. If the lumber is tight against the backboard and then stacked tight against the board the behind it, the boards wont sag due to gravity, as they would if stored flat between horizontal uprights.

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post #10 of 13 Old 05-05-2016, 09:00 PM
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I use my forklift.

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post #11 of 13 Old 05-05-2016, 10:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WarnerConstInc.
I use my forklift.
That's my preferred method. The last time I got lumber I forgot to lay boards across the trailer so I had to load it on the forks by hand and then unload it because it needed stickered.

How Do You Stack Lumber?-image-1268642647.jpg

Forklifts are good for moving firewood too.

How Do You Stack Lumber?-image-2897930959.jpg
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post #12 of 13 Old 08-02-2016, 08:40 AM
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After getting tired of not being able to pull any board out to check grain, etc, I made a on edge rack. One end is at the rear barn oh door, for loading from truck.
Pick a board. Any board. And slide it out.
If I can find out how to post pic from Photobucket, I would post a picture.
Has posting pics changed? Could be me!
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post #13 of 13 Old 08-02-2016, 10:21 AM
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Here (I hope)is a pic.
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