My GF wants a reclaimed chevron sliding door...Would like help with ideas. - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

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post #1 of 38 Old 10-25-2016, 02:57 AM Thread Starter
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My GF wants a reclaimed chevron sliding door...Would like help with ideas.

My GF wants a sliding barn door in a chevron type pattern as seen in the pics, made out of reclaimed wood. This would be a sliding door for the bathroom, meaning water might play a part in construction plans.

My thought is to get a marine grade plywood core, and use reclaimed wood veneers with some wood glue. Do ya'll think this would work well? Woul the veneers hold up and stay stuck?

-David
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post #2 of 38 Old 10-25-2016, 07:11 AM
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It might sound odd but rather than using marine grade plywood it would be better you used particle board with a solid wood banding around the edges. It's not necessary to use waterproof plywood as the door isn't for the shower. Particle board would be more stable and the wood glued to each side of it would seal the moisture out. Particle board is what a door company uses as a core to make a solid core door.

You plan would work however I would recommend using a resin glue to apply the reclaimed wood. Wood glue might take a month or more to dry and could cause the door to warp. Create a good flat surface to assemble the door and weight it down for 24 hours until the glue cures.
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post #3 of 38 Old 10-25-2016, 07:38 AM
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i would agree

marine plywood is overkill. Laminating onto the particle board would work but banding the edges is very important. Working on a flat surface will help keep the door flat. Any do some research on the type of glue that dries in 24 to 36 hours.
It's a cool looking door ... go for it.

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post #4 of 38 Old 10-25-2016, 08:03 AM
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Several options depending on the lumber you use.

A solid sheet is going to be heavy, glue up will be time consuming.

If I had rough lumber I would likely just build a frame from some 1x2, adding bracing strategically to nail the reclaimed lumber to. I would spot glue, and finish nail the boards to the frame. It's reclaimed lumber, there is no issue with a few more nail holes...
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post #5 of 38 Old 10-25-2016, 09:55 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shoot summ View Post
Several options depending on the lumber you use.

A solid sheet is going to be heavy, glue up will be time consuming.

If I had rough lumber I would likely just build a frame from some 1x2, adding bracing strategically to nail the reclaimed lumber to. I would spot glue, and finish nail the boards to the frame. It's reclaimed lumber, there is no issue with a few more nail holes...
I was also thinking this plan, but I feel like this is a more expensive option. Also was worried about wood gaps from different expanding and drying rates.
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post #6 of 38 Old 10-26-2016, 06:15 AM
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I was also thinking this plan, but I feel like this is a more expensive option. Also was worried about wood gaps from different expanding and drying rates.
Not sure how you quantify it as more expensive, 1x2's are relatively cheap, or you could rip the stock from 2x4's. Hollow core interior doors are made in a similar fashion.

The expense in your project is going to be the hardware.

Reclaimed lumber should be very seasoned, and not suffer much from drying at all. Any shrinkage should have happened years ago. And they will do the same thing attached to a sheet of particle board or plywood.

I wouldn't leave reclaimed wood without some sort of coating or penetrating sealer for this application, or any other for that matter.

Good luck with your project.
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post #7 of 38 Old 10-26-2016, 04:16 PM
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What's a bathroom?




OK, good luck. Something different than the plain old interior door.

My wife gives sound advice. 99% sound and 1% advice.
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post #8 of 38 Old 10-26-2016, 07:48 PM
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Joining wood on the diagonal

If you glue thin pieces like veneer down on a plywood or otherwise stable substrate it will have a greater chance of surviving than if the pieces were thicker... in my opinion. Having them meet at ninety degrees on a diagonal means they should not be able to move much, if at all. Wood moves across it's grain, rather than down the length, so you have a whole bunch of dissimilar wood pieces moving in different directions. I wouldn't count on having real tight joints initially and allow the pieces to move some what.

I really like the look and the sliding hardware, BUT don't count on quietly sneaking into the john in the middle of the night without waking up the dog, scaring the cat and startling the GF.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specfic. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo
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post #9 of 38 Old 10-30-2016, 10:59 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
If you glue thin pieces like veneer down on a plywood or otherwise stable substrate it will have a greater chance of surviving than if the pieces were thicker... in my opinion. Having them meet at ninety degrees on a diagonal means they should not be able to move much, if at all. Wood moves across it's grain, rather than down the length, so you have a whole bunch of dissimilar wood pieces moving in different directions. I wouldn't count on having real tight joints initially and allow the pieces to move some what.

I really like the look and the sliding hardware, BUT don't count on quietly sneaking into the john in the middle of the night without waking up the dog, scaring the cat and startling the GF.
Hah! WD-40 will be near by!
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post #10 of 38 Old 11-26-2016, 06:13 PM Thread Starter
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Ya'll think OSB or sheathing plywood would work fine with no warping? I can get a good deal for either one.
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post #11 of 38 Old 12-06-2016, 07:28 PM
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Hah! WD-40 will be near by!
Not to be a turd, but WD-40 would not make a good lubricant...spray some white lithium grease on the bolt the roller with spin on (minus the threads) and let it dry.
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post #12 of 38 Old 12-11-2016, 04:59 PM Thread Starter
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Slight problem.

After I polyurethaned the pine wood side, the OSB has a slight cup to it on both ends. causing it to not lie flat. How do I fix this?
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post #13 of 38 Old 12-12-2016, 09:39 AM
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Originally Posted by David McNamara View Post
Slight problem.

After I polyurethaned the pine wood side, the OSB has a slight cup to it on both ends. causing it to not lie flat. How do I fix this?
Don't use a product that isn't inherently flat, OSB is a bad choice.
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post #14 of 38 Old 12-12-2016, 12:50 PM
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It's not necessarily an issue of the osb not being inherently flat, it's an issue of an unbalanced panel. Doesn't matter the substrate. What I mean is you have solid wood on one side and a piece of ply (in this case osb) on the other. The ply isn't going to grow or shrink with moisture. The solid wood will. When the solid wood grows with humidity, it will bow the panel every time.

Now if you had the same thickness solid wood on the opposite side too, you would have a balanced panel that would be much less likely to warp as both sides grow or shrink evenly.

The only way I've seen to get the bow out is to clamp it up with an opposite bow in the middle. Then leave it for a few days. However, this is just a temporary solution until the wood decides to move again.
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post #15 of 38 Old 12-12-2016, 02:18 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shoot summ View Post
Don't use a product that isn't inherently flat, OSB is a bad choice.
The OSB was flat before the pine wood was added.

Quote:
Originally Posted by J L View Post
It's not necessarily an issue of the osb not being inherently flat, it's an issue of an unbalanced panel. Doesn't matter the substrate. What I mean is you have solid wood on one side and a piece of ply (in this case osb) on the other. The ply isn't going to grow or shrink with moisture. The solid wood will. When the solid wood grows with humidity, it will bow the panel every time.

Now if you had the same thickness solid wood on the opposite side too, you would have a balanced panel that would be much less likely to warp as both sides grow or shrink evenly.

The only way I've seen to get the bow out is to clamp it up with an opposite bow in the middle. Then leave it for a few days. However, this is just a temporary solution until the wood decides to move again.
I will be adding the same thickness of wood on the other side as well, but it is reclaimed wood. I am also planning on adding flat metal bar on the edges, that would add rigidity. I just didn't want to add the reclaimed wood and potentially ruin it, as it was not cheap... If I were to redo the project, how would you go about it?
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post #16 of 38 Old 12-12-2016, 03:18 PM
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Agreed

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Originally Posted by J L View Post
It's not necessarily an issue of the osb not being inherently flat, it's an issue of an unbalanced panel. Doesn't matter the substrate. What I mean is you have solid wood on one side and a piece of ply (in this case osb) on the other. The ply isn't going to grow or shrink with moisture. The solid wood will. When the solid wood grows with humidity, it will bow the panel every time.

Now if you had the same thickness solid wood on the opposite side too, you would have a balanced panel that would be much less likely to warp as both sides grow or shrink evenly.

The only way I've seen to get the bow out is to clamp it up with an opposite bow in the middle. Then leave it for a few days. However, this is just a temporary solution until the wood decides to move again.
I don't understand the Chemistry or the Physics involved, but in my experience anytime you do something to one side of a panel whether it be OSB, MDF, plywood or other, you do have to do the same thing on the other side to prevent warping. Either the surface is sealed off from moisture, or the glue does something, but the result is the same.

Before gluing on the other side I would flatten out the panel with a block in the center and a board with clamps or weights, anything to make it flat. I don't know what glue you used or how you applied it. That may make a difference.... I donno? Rolled on yellow glue, or contact cement...?

Once both sides are "equalized" I think you may be out of the woods......

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specfic. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo
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post #17 of 38 Old 12-12-2016, 03:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David McNamara View Post
The OSB was flat before the pine wood was added.
The only OSB I've ever seen remain flat, was fastened down. It's not regarded as a flat/stable product on it's own. Even Plywood isn't typically the goto product for a perfectly flat result.

Others might be on to something, perhaps when you get the other side done, it will fix it, hope so, because it will be a lot of wasted work and material if it isn't.
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post #18 of 38 Old 12-12-2016, 06:28 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J L View Post
It's not necessarily an issue of the osb not being inherently flat, it's an issue of an unbalanced panel. Doesn't matter the substrate. What I mean is you have solid wood on one side and a piece of ply (in this case osb) on the other. The ply isn't going to grow or shrink with moisture. The solid wood will. When the solid wood grows with humidity, it will bow the panel every time.

Now if you had the same thickness solid wood on the opposite side too, you would have a balanced panel that would be much less likely to warp as both sides grow or shrink evenly.

The only way I've seen to get the bow out is to clamp it up with an opposite bow in the middle. Then leave it for a few days. However, this is just a temporary solution until the wood decides to move again.
I think I plan to put some kerf cuts length wise through the OSB, flatten it out with clamps/wedges, then nail/glue the other wood and hope for the best....

Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
I don't understand the Chemistry or the Physics involved, but in my experience anytime you do something to one side of a panel whether it be OSB, MDF, plywood or other, you do have to do the same thing on the other side to prevent warping. Either the surface is sealed off from moisture, or the glue does something, but the result is the same.

Before gluing on the other side I would flatten out the panel with a block in the center and a board with clamps or weights, anything to make it flat. I don't know what glue you used or how you applied it. That may make a difference.... I donno? Rolled on yellow glue, or contact cement...?

Once both sides are "equalized" I think you may be out of the woods......
I hope so too...

Quote:
Originally Posted by shoot summ View Post
The only OSB I've ever seen remain flat, was fastened down. It's not regarded as a flat/stable product on it's own. Even Plywood isn't typically the goto product for a perfectly flat result.

Others might be on to something, perhaps when you get the other side done, it will fix it, hope so, because it will be a lot of wasted work and material if it isn't.
Will try it and I hope it works out...
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post #19 of 38 Old 12-12-2016, 07:14 PM
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Next time - do both sides at the same time and don't use OSB. Currently, assuming the uninstalled lumber has been stored with the current panel, I'd do what you can to flatten out the existing panel with clamps. Let it set up overnight. Sometimes you can get back what you need. OSB tends to hold a curve well so it may do what you need. Once flat, I'd move forward with the install of the other side. If you're pressed for time, I'd clamp it slightly bowed the opposite direction and install as much wood as possible before removing the clamps. You're essentially installing the wood under tension and hoping that when it's released it will help hold its shape. Obviously riskier that way but sometimes you've gotta do what you've gotta do.

Looking forward to the finished pics.
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post #20 of 38 Old 12-12-2016, 07:30 PM
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The glue you are using can easily cause warpage too. Normal wood glues take a long time to fully cure. When laminating something like the door it would work better to use a resin glue. A resin glue has a hardening agent that will dry throughout the glue up. In order to use wood glue you might have to keep a door like that clamped flat for a week or more.

I also agree with woodenthings in that whatever you do to one side you do the same to the other side. If wood was laminated to the other side and clamped flat for a week I think you might have a chance of salvaging the door.
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