Refinishing dining table - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 14 Old 11-11-2011, 02:57 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 8
View efrisbee's Photo Album My Photos
Refinishing dining table

Hi,

I have refinished occasional tables, and other items items including rifle stocks and have always used Tung oil as the finish. Is this a good finish for a walnut table that gets used everyday? If anyone has any comments, or suggestions I would appreciate it.

Thanks
efrisbee is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 14 Old 11-11-2011, 03:24 PM
Log dog
 
Dominick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Northeast illinois
Posts: 7,933
View Dominick's Photo Album My Photos
I wouldn't use a tung oil on dining table. Not that I wouldn't use tung oil. But if you plan on using it everyday and want to protect it, I would use a good varnish. The varnish I used on my walnut dining table was, Behlen rock hard table top finish. I put 6 coats thinned out with Behlen table top varnish reducer. I'm happy with results the only thing it only comes in high gloss. So I rubbed it out with good 0000 steel wool and bison paste wax. You could use wool and water, rotten stone. There's a lot of different things you can use. Do a search. Here's mine before rub out.

Name:  image-3667073872.jpg
Views: 1192
Size:  43.3 KB

When it's rustic......it's rustic
Dominick is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Dominick For This Useful Post:
efrisbee (11-11-2011)
post #3 of 14 Old 11-12-2011, 02:51 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 67
View Two Knots's Photo Album My Photos
hi esifbee,

I'm new to the forum and this is my first post. We've only made two
walnut projects so far and one was a kitchen table in walnut, the other a bird cage.

We're not professional woodworkers...here is how we finish
a lot of stuff.
On our table, first we seal the wood with BLO and wait the required days for drying, then stain (if your staining the wood)
I am now a fan of sanding sponges -- and sand between coats.

we used minwax gloss finish poly thinned with turp (about 3 parts poly to 1 part turp) we apply all our finishes with
a rag (mostly a demin rag, cut from old jeans) rub the finish on, wait 24 hours between coats. lightly sand before applying the next coat.
apply several coats, wait several days and then rub on paste wax.

The table is in front of a sunny bay window so the back of the table
looks shiny, however the front of the table shows the soft luster
that can be achieved with gloss poly. when thinned, applied with
a rag and light sanding.

I did use a little stain on this table to get it to match the chairs.




Two Knots is offline  
post #4 of 14 Old 11-12-2011, 07:33 AM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,062
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
For a table used daily, pure Tung oil, or BLO will offer very little protection. Your finish regimen may depend on whether you can spray (compressor/gun), not a rattle can.

You might want to enhance the look of the grain by using a slightly thinned mix of BLO and mineral spirits. Or a stain, and then an oil. If you can spray, I would use a satin version of a waterbase polyurethane, lacquer, or conversion varnish.

For an oil base film finish, I would use a wipe on version of a varnish or oil base polyurethane.








.
cabinetman is offline  
post #5 of 14 Old 11-12-2011, 08:28 AM
Log dog
 
Dominick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Northeast illinois
Posts: 7,933
View Dominick's Photo Album My Photos
Poly on dining table with everyday use will chip and crack with hot plates. Not as durable as varnish, especially uv. Just my 2 cents.

When it's rustic......it's rustic
Dominick is offline  
post #6 of 14 Old 11-12-2011, 09:48 AM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,062
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dominick View Post
Poly on dining table with everyday use will chip and crack with hot plates. Not as durable as varnish, especially uv. Just my 2 cents.
From your statement it sounds like you speak from the experience of doing numerous table tops. You use the word "poly", do you mean oil base or water base? If you mean oil base, oil base polyurethane is a "varnish", and by some specifications is more durable than a straight interior varnish.

"UV' is not an issue with interior wood finishing in most cases. JMO.








.
cabinetman is offline  
post #7 of 14 Old 11-12-2011, 10:14 AM
Log dog
 
Dominick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Northeast illinois
Posts: 7,933
View Dominick's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman

From your statement it sounds like you speak from the experience of doing numerous table tops. You use the word "poly", do you mean oil base or water base? If you mean oil base, oil base polyurethane is a "varnish", and by some specifications is more durable than a straight interior varnish.

"UV' is not an issue with interior wood finishing in most cases. JMO.




.
Yea I do a lot of table tops that I do use poly ( min wax oil based) yes I understand that oil based poly is categorized as a varnish. But it's not going to give you the protection of a varnish like behlens rock hard table top finish. Why is uv not an issue with interior wood finish when it sit in the sun? Maybe I don't know,and have been this all wrong.

When it's rustic......it's rustic
Dominick is offline  
post #8 of 14 Old 11-12-2011, 10:36 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: I went back to my private Idaho
Posts: 2,321
View Brink's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dominick

Yea I do a lot of table tops that I do use poly ( min wax oil based) yes I understand that oil based poly is categorized as a varnish. But it's not going to give you the protection of a varnish like behlens rock hard table top finish. Why is uv not an issue with interior wood finish when it sit in the sun? Maybe I don't know,and have been this all wrong.
UV, for the most part, is stopped by glass.
Brink is offline  
post #9 of 14 Old 11-12-2011, 10:39 AM
Log dog
 
Dominick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Northeast illinois
Posts: 7,933
View Dominick's Photo Album My Photos
Oh I didn't realize glass wasn't clear.

When it's rustic......it's rustic
Dominick is offline  
post #10 of 14 Old 11-13-2011, 02:09 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 8
View efrisbee's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks to all that responded

Thanks to all that responded with GREAT! advice. Due to time constraints (my wife wants it done before Christmas) I chose what was easily available locally. That is Minwax oil-based poly.

The reason that it will take so long is that the table has 2 large drop leaves. When closed the table sits 2. With both leaves up it comfortably seats 8. that requires me to do it in three parts. And I can only work at one part at a time.

I just put on the 2nd coat, and it is looking great.

I am looking forward to my next project, I am going to replace the composite stock on my Remington 700 with a fancy grade Caro Walnut stock.

Again... Thanks to all
efrisbee is offline  
post #11 of 14 Old 11-13-2011, 03:16 PM
Log dog
 
Dominick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Northeast illinois
Posts: 7,933
View Dominick's Photo Album My Photos
Glad we could help, hope it goes good. Send pics of table. We all like pics,it helps us understand what you want. Good luck.

When it's rustic......it's rustic
Dominick is offline  
post #12 of 14 Old 11-13-2011, 03:46 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 67
View Two Knots's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by efrisbee View Post
Thanks to all that responded with GREAT! advice. Due to time constraints (my wife wants it done before Christmas) I chose what was easily available locally. That is Minwax oil-based poly.

The reason that it will take so long is that the table has 2 large drop leaves. When closed the table sits 2. With both leaves up it comfortably seats 8. that requires me to do it in three parts. And I can only work at one part at a time.

I just put on the 2nd coat, and it is looking great.

I am looking forward to my next project, I am going to replace the composite stock on my Remington 700 with a fancy grade Caro Walnut stock.

Again... Thanks to all
are you ragging it on? we used minwax gloss oil based poly as well,
cut a little with terp and ragged on.
it's our kitchen table
so it gets a lot of use. I always use placemats though... I have bamboo placemats --
always keep two rolled up (for quick and easy access) behind the table top plant.
good luck...and don't be afraid to apply several light coats.
Two Knots is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Two Knots For This Useful Post:
efrisbee (11-13-2011)
post #13 of 14 Old 02-17-2012, 02:58 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: United States
Posts: 4
View annie's Photo Album My Photos
This process is fairly straightforward. If you have an antique pine dining table, you might want to have it evaluated.
annie is offline  
post #14 of 14 Old 02-17-2012, 03:24 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,023
View chemmy's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dominick View Post
I wouldn't use a tung oil on dining table. Not that I wouldn't use tung oil. But if you plan on using it everyday and want to protect it, I would use a good varnish. The varnish I used on my walnut dining table was, Behlen rock hard table top finish. I put 6 coats thinned out with Behlen table top varnish reducer. I'm happy with results the only thing it only comes in high gloss. So I rubbed it out with good 0000 steel wool and bison paste wax. You could use wool and water, rotten stone. There's a lot of different things you can use. Do a search. Here's mine before rub out.

Attachment 31585
Hey D, you can buy flatting agents [stir in type] to flatten the alkyd varnish ok? My first use of B's, Rock hard was in 65 on our [my dads] D table, the last time i saw it was in 81, looked as good as when it was done. high fives here!!
chemmy is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Refinishing a teak dining table slantedview Wood Finishing 30 05-31-2011 12:06 AM
Refinishing oak dining table - where to start? cclark Wood Finishing 3 10-31-2010 03:24 PM
Refinishing black dining room table Benny Wood Finishing 3 10-26-2009 10:21 PM
Refinishing Dining Table JimDC Wood Finishing 5 10-13-2008 06:11 AM
Refinishing a new oak dining table bof Wood Finishing 8 09-28-2007 10:14 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome