Making the Aqua Fortis look without acid and heat - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

 
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post #1 of 8 Old 01-08-2017, 01:27 PM Thread Starter
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Making the Aqua Fortis look without acid and heat

I really like the way an Aqua Fortis finish looks on figured maple. My project is a banjo neck and really rather not subject it to the acid and the heat. Does anyone have a tried and try recipe for achieving that look using combinations of regular dyes like TransTint?
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post #2 of 8 Old 01-08-2017, 03:11 PM
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Not sure if this will help you or not but when I googled aqua-fortis, this showed up in the search:

http://www.stonewallcreekoutfitters....hes-and-stain/

"If I agreed with you, then we'd both be wrong!"
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post #3 of 8 Old 01-09-2017, 01:35 AM
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You have do to some experiments on scrap wood to get it how you like and to experiment with color combinations, but start with a darker dye stain applied wet to color the darker part of the figure. Let it dry and then sand with 320 grit using a sanding block to get the color off the harder, lighter part of the figure. Then apply a lighter, constrasting color of dye stain. This will give you that depth of color you're looking for.

You can start with a dark brown and then go over with a red, yellow or orange color depending on the final look you're after.
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post #4 of 8 Old 01-09-2017, 12:23 PM Thread Starter
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I did an experiment on a scrap a while back where on some advice I had received, I applied a coat of dark walnut dye which was made using a solution Ferrous sulphate and Transtint dye dissolved in distilled water. I followed that by sanding and then a coat of brown mahogany. I was told the Ferrous Sulphate would really bring out the chatoyance in the curly maple and it seems like it did. BUT, those were applied with a rag, but I want to spray when I do my banjo neck. Are there concerns when spraying the dye made with Ferrous Sulphate solution? I know to use a mask, but are there there other issues? Do I need to concern myself with corrosion in the spray gun? It's mostly stainless, but I know there are some aluminum parts too.

Last edited by Quickstep; 01-09-2017 at 12:26 PM.
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post #5 of 8 Old 01-09-2017, 02:51 PM
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I have sprayed ferrous sulfate before with no problem. Just make sure to spray it on heavy to allow it to puddle a little and soak into the softer grain. Also always wear a respirator no matter what you're spraying!
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post #6 of 8 Old 01-09-2017, 02:53 PM
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Also you really don't require a lot of atomization to spray the first coat so keep your air pressure low enough to just spray it out in droplets. Less hazard of breathing in atomized particles that way. :)
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post #7 of 8 Old 01-09-2017, 07:00 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks, Rick -

Do you think the Ferrous Sulphate really adds to the chatoyance and shimmer on curly maple?
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post #8 of 8 Old 01-09-2017, 07:23 PM
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I used it mainly to get that aged grey color on wood instead of soaking steel wool in vinegar. I didn't really see a difference between most chemical stains and dye stains as far as chatoyance goes, however George Frank swore by it. I would say do your own samples and decide what you like best.
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