Toxic or harmful fumes - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

 
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post #1 of 11 Old 01-14-2008, 10:51 AM Thread Starter
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Toxic or harmful fumes

Does plywood release anything fatal (after a long time exposure) fumes?

Will an electric fan blowing dust and fumes and possibly toxic fume away from me towards an open window enough?

Will i be able to live for a long time with shop vac?

And finally any unsafe wood I should look out for?

Thanks!
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post #2 of 11 Old 01-14-2008, 07:00 PM
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The only ones I have dealt with are walnut and older treated lumber. You should wear a facemask when sanding or scrollsawing walnut as it has toxic qualities. Mostly from inhalation so anything that creates real fine dust should be done with protection. I have fried one shopvac so recommend a regular dust collector. for one machine the small 1hp's arent bad but if you can go for the 2hp model. The olde treated woods used a cyanide solution and are known to release harmful fumes if you work with it much.
I am sure there are others that others in this forum can help you with. These are the ones I am familure with.

Last edited by drcollins804; 01-14-2008 at 07:16 PM. Reason: wrong word due to misspelling
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post #3 of 11 Old 01-14-2008, 10:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikeldigra View Post
Does plywood release anything fatal (after a long time exposure) fumes?

Will an electric fan blowing dust and fumes and possibly toxic fume away from me towards an open window enough?

Will i be able to live for a long time with shop vac?

And finally any unsafe wood I should look out for?

Thanks!
You are asking the kind of question that could not be answered........life is very short and you should enjoy every moment of it. If it contains glues or chemicals then yes it has the ability to kill you, how much will it take is the question. Water is the woodworkers enemy to much and the project fails too little and the project fails....I am certain more people die from drowning then anything in my shop....but I have no problem putting on a dust mask and firing up the dust collector and filtering the air when no equiptment is even running. Why? because I can and I, like you really like my life and wish to enjoy it until I can not anymore....
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post #4 of 11 Old 09-03-2008, 01:45 AM Thread Starter
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so how much is too much? : /
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post #5 of 11 Old 09-03-2008, 03:31 AM
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Well, as for regular wood dust, it would probably take a long time to kill you. But in the meantime, it could cause you respiratory problems. Lots of old time woodworkers never wore dust masks or had dust collectors. They didn't necessarily die early, but I cannot attest to their respiratory health.

On the other hand, when you bring plywood into the picture, you are adding glues to the mixture. I know that I have had respiratory problems almost immediately when working with particle board(melamine) and having an inadequate dust mask on. With plywood, it's not as immediate, but after a day of cutting it up, the dust and fumes weigh heavy in the air of my shop, and it can irritate my throat after even 15 or 20 minutes without my respirator on. So perhaps these experiences will give you an idea of how much is too much, or how little is enough to cause a problem.
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post #6 of 11 Old 09-03-2008, 10:20 AM
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How toxic certain materials and chemicals are could be dependent on the extent of exposure, and how susceptible an individual is. As for toxic woods, this site has a list.

Most composite board sheet stock uses a urea-formaldehyde glue in it's process. Some manufacturers have substituted glue types. For specific brands and types, look at the MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet) specifications for the particular item.

As for chemical vapor inhalation, many common shop chemicals are very toxic, such as lacquer thinner, mineral spirits, acetone, lacquer paint, some urethanes, solvent based contact cement and others. This hazard is extended to virtually any area that can be affected such as the ear openings, eyes, nose, and other orifices that I won't mention.

For the toxic or hazardous chemicals, direct contact with the skin is also a source of ingestion. What can the results produce? Many ailments can be attributed to absorbed chemicals. I for one have been a victim of nerve damage in the fingers and hands, bladder cancer, respiratory problems, and some loss of smell sensitivity. As for brain damage...the jury is still out on that one.

My exposure can be considered extreme, being a daily event for 38 years. When very little data was available on these safety issues, there was a natural aversion to properly equip a shop with an effective dust system, respirators for non-spraying procedures, and the use of gloves. Shop owners then had an attitude like "real men don't need that stuff". Well, contrary to that type of thinking, I found out they definitely do.






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post #7 of 11 Old 09-03-2008, 06:20 PM
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Thanks for posting the link to that list cabinetman that is good to have.

John

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post #8 of 11 Old 09-07-2008, 12:39 AM
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I know that MDF has that formaldehyde based glue in it which is bad for you in numerous ways, plus MDF generates a lot of fine dust which is bad as well. I'm not sure about plywoods (maybe exterior ones) but in the past they use a cupro-arsenate compound to preserve the wood and that stuff is VERY bad for you. Burning pressure treated wood is a complete no-no as you'll then create some deadly arsenic containing gases.
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post #9 of 11 Old 11-19-2008, 08:23 PM
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Thumbs up Trend Airshield Pro - Respirator

Quote:
Originally Posted by mmwood_1 View Post
Well, as for regular wood dust, it would probably take a long time to kill you. But in the meantime, it could cause you respiratory problems. Lots of old time woodworkers never wore dust masks or had dust collectors. They didn't necessarily die early, but I cannot attest to their respiratory health.
That is very true and your respiratory health is nothing to mess with. There is a product out there called the Trend Airshield Pro that many woodworkers use. It is excellent for hobbyists as well as professional woodworkers. You can take a look at it at the following link. http://www.airwareamerica.com/trendairshieldpro.aspx
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post #10 of 11 Old 11-19-2008, 08:32 PM
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Originally Posted by drcollins804 View Post
The only ones I have dealt with are walnut and older treated lumber. You should wear a facemask when sanding or scrollsawing walnut as it has toxic qualities. Mostly from inhalation so anything that creates real fine dust should be done with protection. I have fried one shopvac so recommend a regular dust collector. for one machine the small 1hp's arent bad but if you can go for the 2hp model. The olde treated woods used a cyanide solution and are known to release harmful fumes if you work with it much.
I am sure there are others that others in this forum can help you with. These are the ones I am familure with.
What is your source on the toxic properties of walnut? Exactly what are the toxins?

George
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post #11 of 11 Old 11-20-2008, 02:09 AM
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Saftey first!
that was covert

Last edited by Youngman; 11-20-2008 at 02:16 AM. Reason: difine covert
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