easy wood tools - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 19 Old 02-25-2011, 08:59 PM Thread Starter
Yea i got wood
 
robert421960's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Rockholds Ky
Posts: 3,015
View robert421960's Photo Album My Photos
easy wood tools

i have seen the back and forth opinions about these in different post so i just would like several opinions from alot of people on these
do you just like the hss tools because you are use to them maybe?
i have to buy some new tools and want to do the right thing
i have always turned dry wood
robert421960 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 19 Old 02-25-2011, 09:27 PM Thread Starter
Yea i got wood
 
robert421960's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Rockholds Ky
Posts: 3,015
View robert421960's Photo Album My Photos
sorry guys i just remembered seeing another thread just like this
but more comments and opinions would be great
robert421960 is offline  
post #3 of 19 Old 02-25-2011, 10:47 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Baxter, Tennessee
Posts: 3,257
View john lucas's Photo Album My Photos
The easy wood tools are, well easy. There isn't any learning curve you just attack the wood. They are scraping tools and as such will leave a finish that is not so good on end grain portions. If you don't mind sanding then I guess that's alright. With some gently cutting on good wood they leave a pretty good finish.
They are also quite expensive. You could buy 2 or 3 other turning tools for the price of the easywoodtools. Now if you build your own that's a different story.
The downside of using them is you don't get to learn the bowl gouge. The bowl gouge used properly will take off wood just as fast and will leave a better finish that takes less sanding. There are times when a bowl gouge is much better. However you have to practice with it to get to this level.
Everyone says you don't need to sharpen them. True, but then you don't learn to sharpen. During your turning career you will probably get several tools that still need to be sharpened. It takes practice to learn to sharpen properly. It is a good skill to have because you will probably need it sooner or later.
I'm not against the tools. If it helps you have fun turning then that's what it's all about. I just think that learning to use a bowl gouge and other tools will take you to the next level and if you decide to stay in turning. Most turners go through a phase where they use scrapers. They are easy tools to use. However they learn to get better shapes and cleaner cuts with cutting tools and then only use scrapers when absolutely necessary.
john lucas is offline  
post #4 of 19 Old 02-25-2011, 10:50 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: UP of Michigan
Posts: 938
View Bob Willing's Photo Album My Photos
I have been using the EW tools now for about 1 year and all of my turning are spindle and dry wood. I could not use wet wood for any of my calls or peper mills. When you laminate you will get some tearing between the different woods so I resort to the standard HSS tool to get a fine finish. I have also noticed that the smaller the diameter the more chattering I get with the EW tools. I am still trying to work out different techniques. I use the detailer for beads etc, but even that in the end grains will give you chatter, and catches. They say to keep the cutting edge on center with the spindle, but there is a little give here also. One other thing if you strike the edge on the casting of your lathe with the tool you will chip the tip or edge of the carbide (carbide is brittle). So be carful how you set them down.

Last edited by Bob Willing; 02-25-2011 at 11:00 PM.
Bob Willing is offline  
post #5 of 19 Old 02-26-2011, 07:36 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Jacksonville, NC
Posts: 517
View wildwood's Photo Album My Photos
The words no sharpening required appeals to woodturners old and new. NO, secret eventually you have to replace carbide cutters. Some folks touch up the edge with diamond card hones. Re-sharpening those carbide cutters, not an option. Still does not stop turners asking for advice on how too! What is replacement cost of one carbide cutter +shipping?



Whole bunch of carbide cutting turning tools available from different people and vendors and already posted you can make your own carbide tools.


Carbide cutting tools do as advertized; do they do the job faster and better than regular turning gouges and scrappers? I am saving my money!
wildwood is offline  
post #6 of 19 Old 02-26-2011, 07:37 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Jacksonville, NC
Posts: 517
View wildwood's Photo Album My Photos
Ended up duplicate post!

Last edited by wildwood; 02-26-2011 at 07:40 AM.
wildwood is offline  
post #7 of 19 Old 02-26-2011, 10:11 AM
Just makin chips fly
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: FL an NC
Posts: 642
View The woodsman's Photo Album My Photos
Easy wood tools

I have the Ci1 ,2 an easy finisher,the last of which I only use for cleaning up the inside of bowls.I won it in a raffle or I wouldn't have one.Now I just got started in pen making an all I use is the Ci1 and it works fantastic for me.thats all I use on the pens,then start sanding with 220 and that makes me a happy camper,as for what John said,you should learn how to use gouges,I have about 5 of Doug Thompsons and wouldn'r buy anything else,some say there a bit pricey,but next to other big name brands,I think there about the same,not to mention there a better tool. So IMO I think there the best investment for the bucks

God Bless all
Ken Ward
The woodsman is offline  
post #8 of 19 Old 02-26-2011, 11:54 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Whittier, CA. USA
Posts: 344
View jlord's Photo Album My Photos
I just bought the CI3 Mid Size Finisher & have used it a little. Bought it for the Tru-Stone pen blanks. I like the tool but for the wood & acrylic blanks I still use 1/2" oval skew & never have to use lower than 600 grit. Learning to sharpen is a must if you keep turning. I use a Wolverine setup & keeping the tools sharp while turning does not take long at all once you get used to it. Less than a minute & your back to working on your project. You will spend more time trying to smooth out a finish created by a dull tool.

James
Whittier, CA.

Just because you can, doesn't always mean you should!

Last edited by jlord; 02-26-2011 at 11:56 AM.
jlord is offline  
post #9 of 19 Old 02-26-2011, 04:57 PM
Just makin chips fly
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: FL an NC
Posts: 642
View The woodsman's Photo Album My Photos
never have to use lower than 600 grit. Showoff Heck anytime I can start above 40 grit,I'm a happy camper I have a friend that turns orniments with a skew and then just polishes them he's a showoff too

God Bless all
Ken Ward
The woodsman is offline  
post #10 of 19 Old 02-27-2011, 02:28 PM
Senior Member
 
RetiredLE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Eastern WA State
Posts: 308
View RetiredLE's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by The woodsman View Post
never have to use lower than 600 grit. Showoff Heck anytime I can start above 40 grit,I'm a happy camper I have a friend that turns orniments with a skew and then just polishes them he's a showoff too
They are the Van Gogh(s) of wood. I hate em too....

--
When you think about it, God has to be the best inventor of all time. He took a rib from Adam and made a loudspeaker.
RetiredLE is offline  
post #11 of 19 Old 02-27-2011, 06:06 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Jacksonville, NC
Posts: 517
View wildwood's Photo Album My Photos
I strive for off the tool finish. No, my work always needs sanding before finish is applied. Why, bevel riding burnishes the wood. Still get some tear out and tool marks and pesky ridges on wood surfaces. While have resorted to 80-grit tool, and sometimes whish had some 60- grit. Try to avoid those situations, they make sanding out those scratches much harder. Starting at 120-grit or higher makes life easier.

On wood and acrylic pens only use three tools, roughing gouge, skew, and parting tool have never gone below 250-grit sandpaper. Rarely use anything but micromesh on acrylic pens. I only wet sand with micromesh whether wood or acrylic. Never use micromesh on wood until finish is applied.
wildwood is offline  
post #12 of 19 Old 02-27-2011, 11:53 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: McKinney, Tx
Posts: 763
View Bonanza35's Photo Album My Photos
I'm new to turning and started with only Easy Tools. They got me started fast and work great in most applications. I still feel like I'm missing out on a lot by not learning to use and sharpen traditional tools so I'm about to spend my money twice just to find out.
Also there is the frustration of deciding when to give in and rotate/replace the blade. A quick touch up on a gouge is a much smaller commitment than a $15 blade change. (I don't like commitment. Just ask my wife).
My guess as a beginner is that they have there place but can't totally replace traditional tools.
Bonanza35 is offline  
post #13 of 19 Old 02-28-2011, 09:36 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Baxter, Tennessee
Posts: 3,257
View john lucas's Photo Album My Photos
Bonanza You are exactly right. I think they might be good tools to get a beginner hooked. They are really easy to use so you avoid most of the frustration of learning to use the cutting tools. For that reason I think they are good. The bad side is they teach bad habits. You can only control the cut by how and which direction you push.
With a bowl gouge you control the cut much like you control the tiller of a boat. You move the handle which of course adjusts the angle of the bevel. The tool goes where the bevel points. Your hand is about 12 to 16" away from the bevel or pivot point so you have a much finer control over the direction of cut and consequently the shape of the bowl.
john lucas is offline  
post #14 of 19 Old 02-28-2011, 10:16 AM Thread Starter
Yea i got wood
 
robert421960's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Rockholds Ky
Posts: 3,015
View robert421960's Photo Album My Photos
look at this and see what you say
looks alot better than $140
http://www.harrisonspecialties.com/m...theAccessories
robert421960 is offline  
post #15 of 19 Old 02-28-2011, 11:42 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Baxter, Tennessee
Posts: 3,257
View john lucas's Photo Album My Photos
That's a much better price and more in line with the actual cost. You can buy the cutters as cheap as 80 cents apiece if you look hard enough. Your only real cost is the machining of the bar.
john lucas is offline  
post #16 of 19 Old 02-28-2011, 01:25 PM Thread Starter
Yea i got wood
 
robert421960's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Rockholds Ky
Posts: 3,015
View robert421960's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by john lucas View Post
That's a much better price and more in line with the actual cost. You can buy the cutters as cheap as 80 cents apiece if you look hard enough. Your only real cost is the machining of the bar.
i wonder if the cheap cutters will fit these?
robert421960 is offline  
post #17 of 19 Old 03-01-2011, 09:13 PM Thread Starter
Yea i got wood
 
robert421960's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Rockholds Ky
Posts: 3,015
View robert421960's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by robert421960 View Post
look at this and see what you say
looks alot better than $140
http://www.harrisonspecialties.com/m...theAccessories
i bought 2 of them so i will report my opinion soon
robert421960 is offline  
post #18 of 19 Old 03-02-2011, 12:11 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 23
View momomo6789's Photo Album My Photos
ewt vs box elder = rip out their only good for removing wood. this is after it was sanded slightly



heres a pic of the inside :) 16x31/4, 1/4 thickness 3/8 bottom


Last edited by momomo6789; 03-02-2011 at 12:15 AM.
momomo6789 is offline  
post #19 of 19 Old 03-06-2011, 12:04 PM Thread Starter
Yea i got wood
 
robert421960's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Rockholds Ky
Posts: 3,015
View robert421960's Photo Album My Photos
i got my handle ready for my new tool
i cant wait to get em and try them out
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC_0807.jpg
Views:	294
Size:	80.8 KB
ID:	21868  

robert421960 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
easy wood tools tcleve4911 Woodturning 11 02-19-2011 05:47 PM
Climate and wood / tools btyirin General Woodworking Discussion 7 03-26-2009 11:34 PM
Hollowing tools and Ci1 Easy Rougher HLW Woodturning 9 02-06-2009 11:46 PM
Sharpening wood turning tools brwoodcrafts Woodturning 3 06-08-2008 09:23 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome