edge jointing with a router - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 17 Old 12-23-2011, 10:48 PM Thread Starter
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 20,047
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
edge jointing with a router

This always comes up when discussing "do I need a jointer?" or "which should I get first, a jointer or planer?"
So, the answer is you can plane with a router and you can joint with a router.... if you have to.
Here's a neat video from our member thitz:

Here's the corresponding video "Planing with a Router":


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specfic. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo

Last edited by woodnthings; 12-23-2011 at 10:55 PM.
woodnthings is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 17 Old 12-23-2011, 11:52 PM
The New Guy
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Down south, where the food is good.
Posts: 1,200
View Itchytoe's Photo Album My Photos
I can completely understand jointing with the router, but planing? Planers aren't that expensive are they?
Itchytoe is offline  
post #3 of 17 Old 12-24-2011, 12:10 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 258
View mwhafner's Photo Album My Photos
One application where I joint on a router table is when working with highly figured woods where tear-out can be an issue on a standard straight-knife jointer. I use a spiral bit on my table, and that helps tremendously.

A track saw also works amazingly well to edge joint stock, in the right circumstances.

Quote:
I can completely understand jointing with the router, but planing? Planers aren't that expensive are they?
No, but a planer won't flatten a board like this method will (cups, warps, etc). Think of it more like a method of face-jointing large stock.
mwhafner is offline  
post #4 of 17 Old 12-24-2011, 12:14 AM
I hate tools
 
cocheseuga's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Kennesaw, GA
Posts: 578
View cocheseuga's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by mwhafner View Post

No, but a planer won't flatten a board like this method will (cups, warps, etc). Think of it more like a method of face-jointing large stock.
There is a way.

http://www.finewoodworking.com/Skill...e.aspx?id=5245

I tried edge jointing with my router table, and it kept ruining boards, no matter what I tried. Gave up and invested in a jointer.
cocheseuga is offline  
post #5 of 17 Old 12-24-2011, 12:19 AM Thread Starter
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 20,047
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Itchytoe View Post
I can completely understand jointing with the router, but planing? Planers aren't that expensive are they?
Planers are more expensive than jointers in a stationary tool, about the same in a bench top.

Planers: http://www.grizzly.com/products/cate...spx?key=490000

Jointers: http://www.grizzly.com/products/cate...spx?key=450000

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specfic. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo
woodnthings is online now  
post #6 of 17 Old 12-24-2011, 12:23 AM Thread Starter
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 20,047
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Did you see the 2 Videos?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cocheseuga View Post
The videos show 2 types of sleds both similar. The advantage to a router sled is that for planing very large surfaces, like table tops or slabs which will not fit in a typical planer, 15" or 20". bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specfic. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo

Last edited by woodnthings; 12-24-2011 at 12:56 AM.
woodnthings is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to woodnthings For This Useful Post:
mdntrdr (12-24-2011)
post #7 of 17 Old 12-24-2011, 06:36 AM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,062
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Planing with a router can be done but there are caveats. It makes a lot of dust and a heckuva mess. Depending on the size, it can get time consuming.

Without a flat surface to start with (which face goes down), The planed surface will register on how the board sits. IOW, a board in the rough, may be fuller along one side, or have high and low spots. If this is the side that goes down for the initial passes on the reverse side, it would have to be shimmed (to the best ability) to get a fairly parallel surface.

Once flipped and the second side is machined, it will plane however it is set up. The board then would have to be edge jointed to get a perpendicular edge (square) to the newly planed surfaces.






.
cabinetman is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to cabinetman For This Useful Post:
del schisler (12-27-2011)
post #8 of 17 Old 12-24-2011, 11:49 AM
I hate tools
 
cocheseuga's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Kennesaw, GA
Posts: 578
View cocheseuga's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
The videos show 2 types of sleds both similar. The advantage to a router sled is that for planing very large surfaces, like table tops or slabs which will not fit in a typical planer, 15" or 20". bill
The disadvantage is that it can take until the apocalypse. I'd rather rip something down to fit in my planer than have to do that again, if at all possible.
cocheseuga is offline  
post #9 of 17 Old 12-24-2011, 01:44 PM Thread Starter
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 20,047
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
the application and the tools avaiable

Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
This always comes up when discussing "do I need a jointer?" or "which should I get first, a jointer or planer?"
So, the answer is you can plane with a router and you can joint with a router.... if you have to.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cocheseuga View Post
The disadvantage is that it can take until the apocalypse. I'd rather rip something down to fit in my planer than have to do that again, if at all possible.
AS with any woodworking process it depends on...

1. The size of the workpiece. For instance a large slab chainsaw milled from a stump or tree. You would not be able to rip and glue this size workpiece or would you want to:


2. The tools and machines available in the shop. Folks just starting and or on a budget may not have jointer or planer at this stage, but they may have a router and lots of time....
It actually goes faster than I thought it would.

I made a long 11 ft x 15" wide glue up for a decorative column in the shop. It was too long and too heavy for me to manage
So I used a router to increase the width of the inner channel.
Here: Capping a post with Oak

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specfic. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo
woodnthings is online now  
post #10 of 17 Old 12-24-2011, 06:43 PM
Senior Member
 
PPBART's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 130
View PPBART's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
...you can joint with a router.... if you have to...
Used the "MDF clamped under edge" method this afternoon to joint a nice straight edge on a 5/4x(~)8x4' piece of mahogany -- worked fine, even if I had to make two passes.

Think I'll rig up a jig after Christmas and try router-planing a few blocks of pecan salvaged from a tree cut many years ago, sitting in the corner of my shop since. Each is about the size of a good piece of firewood, ~6x6x24", pretty rough and uneven.
PPBART is offline  
post #11 of 17 Old 12-30-2011, 09:06 PM Thread Starter
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 20,047
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
joining and jointing larger boards

Nice easy way to join to large or wider boards to insure there are no offsets in the glue up:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specfic. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo

Last edited by woodnthings; 12-30-2011 at 11:19 PM.
woodnthings is online now  
post #12 of 17 Old 12-31-2011, 01:01 AM Thread Starter
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 20,047
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
I bought an edge joint bit like this

Got one for the shaper and ordered one for the router table.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000IZC39S/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_1?pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B0000225XN&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=0CWRFC506H8ZZVJ2YS03
Seems like a great way to make certain the boards don't shift in the glue up process.
A Thintz Video on the use of the bit:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specfic. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo
woodnthings is online now  
post #13 of 17 Old 12-31-2011, 09:45 AM
No Longer Here
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 5,465
View knotscott's Photo Album My Photos
I think the key to accurate edge jointing using any method (jointer, router, TS) is getting a flat reference face to start with. If the face isn't flat, it's hard to ensure that the jointed edge is a true 90 to the face.

A jointer is the easiest and most effective way to flatten a face, but a planer can do it with the help of a planer sled...you can also use a hand plane, drum sander, or a router with a jig as shown in the video. I suspect it'd take a good long time to flatten a large board using the router.
knotscott is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to knotscott For This Useful Post:
woodnthings (12-31-2011)
post #14 of 17 Old 12-31-2011, 09:58 AM Thread Starter
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 20,047
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
totally agree

What I was suggesting was a way to keep the boards in registration using the router lock bit, a self positioning joint so to speak. My issue is that the board shifts slightly under clamping pressure and as a result I need cauls or clamps across the surface to maintain a continuous smooth surface.

It may be my technique either on the glue up or that the boards are not perfectly straight or flat...I donno? Others here seem to have the same issue, so I offered the router lock bit video.
The tongue and groove seemed like another simple method .
Both would seem to require jointed edges and surfaces, but another post by WillemJM discussed that and found it not necessary.

Were you to glue up this table top???

bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specfic. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo

Last edited by woodnthings; 12-31-2011 at 10:00 AM.
woodnthings is online now  
post #15 of 17 Old 01-15-2012, 11:32 AM
Senior Member
 
Sbrooks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 120
View Sbrooks's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks for this. I'm new to woodworking. This is a good way for me to save money . My tool wish list is very long lol
Sbrooks is offline  
post #16 of 17 Old 07-15-2012, 05:46 PM
Senior Member
 
MidGAOutdoor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 1,013
View MidGAOutdoor's Photo Album My Photos
instead of the mdf in the first video, can i clamo my guide that i use with my skilsaw to the lengthy board and let the router follow that?trying to joint 8ft boards for booshelf build
MidGAOutdoor is offline  
post #17 of 17 Old 07-20-2012, 06:10 PM
Senior Member
 
mattk8715's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: MI
Posts: 190
View mattk8715's Photo Album My Photos
I found this to work well for shaving off saw marks http://www.amazon.com/Freud-SH-5-Professional-Micro-Adjustable-Router/dp/B00005Q7CN/ref=sr_1_1?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1342818715&sr=1-1&keywords=freud+router+fenceI like the independant adjustability of each side of the fence. Before that I wouldn't do it because w/ a shim it seemed I was always loosing at least 1/16".

Not a fan of it for a general router table fence though because the fence boards are kind of flimsy; but it does work well for taking 1/32" off a board after its been ripped to clean it up.

Also, the Festool track saw can't be beat for straight edging rough sawn lumber. Picture perfect, straight boards w/ it.

beer me

Last edited by mattk8715; 07-20-2012 at 06:15 PM.
mattk8715 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Table edge router bit ? info General Woodworking Discussion 3 10-11-2011 12:01 PM
Anyone use a router edge guide? The type that secures to the router itself.. 240sxguy General Woodworking Discussion 11 06-06-2011 08:35 PM
Jointing at edge/corner of case for minimalist simple design Oneuni Joinery 2 10-24-2010 11:40 AM
Jointing with a Portable Planer. Easy Jointing juanation General Woodworking Discussion 10 02-09-2010 10:45 AM
Edge joint router bit RobieMo Joinery 3 04-27-2009 06:35 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome