Cutting laminate for kitchen sink - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 14 Old 04-02-2011, 12:29 AM Thread Starter
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Cutting laminate for kitchen sink

I need some professional advice on cutting the hole for my kitchen sink in my new pre-made laminate countertop. What is the best tool to use to ensure that I don't chip the laminate and should I cut from the bottom or top?
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post #2 of 14 Old 04-02-2011, 01:09 AM
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I use a jig saw and cut from the top after drilling a starter hole in each corner.

Use the cutout template that came with your sink or measure the sink carefully and make your own template out of cardboard. Mark the locations of the faucet/sprayer holes in your sink on your template and make sure that when you locate the template from front to back on the countertop that your faucet will clear any possible obstruction beneath.

Don't worry about chipout. There usually is some but it will be covered by the overhang on the sink.

Before you install the sink smear the cut edges of the hole in the countertop with silicone to prevent damage should water find its way under the edge of the sink.

Do the same to the raw bottom edge of the countertop over your dishwasher to prevent steam damage.

Good luck

Jeff
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post #3 of 14 Old 04-02-2011, 01:10 AM
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Probably a rotary tool, Rotozip or router, will give the smoothest cut. Sawzall would probably be the most efficient. I've cut them out with a circular saw. Why are you concerned about chipout, rimless sink?
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post #4 of 14 Old 04-02-2011, 03:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jschaben
Probably a rotary tool, Rotozip or router, will give the smoothest cut. Sawzall would probably be the most efficient. I've cut them out with a circular saw. Why are you concerned about chipout, rimless sink?
These suggestions will absolutely work but if you use a sawzall drill starter holes large enough to accommodate the wider blade. The sawzall will be easiest as the back cut will be too close to backsplash to use a router or, I think a Roto Zip.

IMO 3/4" deep cut is too much to do in one pass with a router.

Best way for speed would be to drill starter holes at the corners, plunge cut side and front cuts with a circular saw then finish up the back cut with a sawzall.

If your not comfortable with plunge-cutting with the CS just use a jig saw or Sawzall. You can control the blade speed with these where you can't with the CS.

The safest method is going to be the one you feel most comfortable with.

My eyes aren't what they used to be so I mark my lines on blue painters tape that I've put down especialy if the countertop is a dark color.

Jeff
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post #5 of 14 Old 04-02-2011, 04:44 AM
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Jig saw with a t101b blade by Bosch. A sawsaw is not good especially for someone with not a lot of experience behind this tool. Also cut two board longer than the cutout. When you cut half of the cutout screw the boards down to the cutout section spanning the hole this will hold the drop out from falling in. When your done cutting simply lift out the cut out and discard
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post #6 of 14 Old 04-02-2011, 05:20 AM
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Assuming the top is loose, if you have a paper template for the sink, cut it out and trace the outer edge onto the top. If it's an old sink (or existing with no template), draw the rectangle about 3/8" smaller than the sink edge if it's self rimming. Use a quarter for creating radiused corners.

Cut from the top. Drill a 3/8" hole at the inside edge of one corner. With a jig saw and a downcutting blade (cuts on the down stroke) cut out the hole.

FYI #1 If you don't have a downcutting blade and you are totally broke, and the piggy bank and your wife's purse is empty, you can use a good metal cutting blade in the jigsaw. That will produce a pretty good cut with minimal to no chipping.

FYI #2 If the top is loose, that's the best time to install the sink and faucet assembly. Beats to heck crawling inside a cabinet. DAMHIKT.








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post #7 of 14 Old 04-02-2011, 09:01 AM
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I use the t101b blade in my Bosch jigsaw like MastersHand mentioned along with blue tape to not only see my line but to protect the surface from chipping and scratches from the tools.

One issue that usually arises from preformed countertops, is getting a tool that is narrow enough to cut near the backsplash.
If the top is loose, I will cut from the backside with my circular saw and my jigsaw.

While still loose, mount the sink and install the sink and counter as a unit so you don't have to fight the sink clips while laying on your back inside of a cabinet.


Learning more about tools everyday
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post #8 of 14 Old 04-02-2011, 06:52 PM
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The rim will hide the cut, and the rims are usually pretty generous.

Therefore, anything that can make the cut can be used, and you don't need to worry about chipping the laminate. That's the whole purpose of the rim. Cut from the top. (Doesn't really matter, and top is easiest.)

I usually use a drill in the corners, then connect them with a skillsaw.

~Jammer
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post #9 of 14 Old 04-04-2011, 11:13 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the help guys. I don't know what I was so worried about...there was no chipping and the sink went in without a hitch. You guys are the best. Here are some pics to prove that I did something.



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post #10 of 14 Old 04-04-2011, 12:22 PM
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Nicely done....

I'll leave the obvious remarks about the rest of the 'honey do' projects to the others.

Sink install looks very professional.

Learning more about tools everyday
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post #11 of 14 Old 04-04-2011, 04:55 PM
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I used a hole saw the right size to match the sink radius and just measured in from my template. I cut from the bottom side with a jigsaw but I used an up-cutting blade. You basically want to cut the laminate in the direction it is supported. Use a circular saw to cut them to length and router to trim the edge laminate.
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post #12 of 14 Old 04-04-2011, 08:36 PM
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good thing you remembered the radius, i have seen alot of guys go doh after cutting theirs haha
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post #13 of 14 Old 04-05-2011, 02:17 AM
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Dun good!!!!!

Jeff
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post #14 of 14 Old 04-05-2011, 09:33 AM
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Great job!

Looks good.
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