pin oak vs red oak - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 10 Old 04-02-2012, 01:49 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
nblasa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 281
View nblasa's Photo Album My Photos
pin oak vs red oak

I'm sure that this question has come up before, but the search feature was no help. Does anyone have a useful way to distinguish between red oak and pin oak? (other than cutting down the tree) The leaves are so similar that I have a hard time distinguishing between the two.
nblasa is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 10 Old 04-02-2012, 04:07 PM
dat
Senior Member
 
dat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,006
View dat's Photo Album My Photos
from what I remember a pin oak kinda has a more squared trunk than a red oak, but I'm just going om memory from cutting firewood
dat is offline  
post #3 of 10 Old 04-02-2012, 08:07 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 260
View ETWW's Photo Album My Photos
Here's a link to a good description of the difference between the two.

http://www.ehow.com/how_8233381_iden...s-pin-oak.html
ETWW is offline  
post #4 of 10 Old 04-07-2012, 01:25 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Morrilton, AR
Posts: 3
View McBryde's Photo Album My Photos
Pin oaks have pointed leaves and red oaks have rounded leaves.
Just remember P is for Pin and Pointed and R is for Red and Rounded.

E
McBryde is offline  
post #5 of 10 Old 04-07-2012, 10:16 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
nblasa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 281
View nblasa's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by McBryde
Pin oaks have pointed leaves and red oaks have rounded leaves.
Just remember P is for Pin and Pointed and R is for Red and Rounded.

E
I thought white oak had rounded leaves.
nblasa is offline  
post #6 of 10 Old 04-08-2012, 12:37 PM
Forgotten but not gone
 
TexasTimbers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,689
View TexasTimbers's Photo Album My Photos
A pin oak is in the red oak (lobotae) section. Red oak species have pointed lobes. White oak species have rounded lobes on their leaves. When you ask how to tell the difference between "a red oak" and a "pin oak" be sure you know which species of red oak you are trying to identify.

Is it northern red oak? Southern red oak? Is it a shumard oak? Blackjack oak?
TexasTimbers is offline  
post #7 of 10 Old 04-16-2012, 05:37 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
nblasa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 281
View nblasa's Photo Album My Photos
Yeah, didn't know how ignorant I was, so thats nice to realize . I live in Illinois and I have been told that pin oak is no good for woodworking because of all the knots from dead branches. I don't know much about species, and I'm just trying to figure out which of my trees would be worth milling. I'll make a point to do more homework next time, just trying to take the easy route by asking you guys. Thanks for all the input.
nblasa is offline  
post #8 of 10 Old 04-16-2012, 07:10 PM
dat
Senior Member
 
dat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,006
View dat's Photo Album My Photos
I kinda like knots in lumber, it makes a plain old board stand up and holler for you to look at it
dat is offline  
post #9 of 10 Old 04-17-2012, 05:08 AM
Senior Member
 
HomeBody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Findlay, IL
Posts: 135
View HomeBody's Photo Album My Photos
Red oak branches sweep upward, white oak outward, and pin oak downward.

I've had pin oaks in my yard for many years. The reason that pin oaks have drooping branches is because they can't shed their leaves during a drought. To conserve moisture, the lower branches droop to lessen the evaporation rate of the ground around the tree. They also have a shallow root system which makes them good for transplanting.

I had the biggest pin oak in Macon County IL in my yard until it was hit by lightning twice. We had to take it down. It was cut up for firewood but I saved one small piece for nostalgia. I wasn't into wood that much back then. Here is what it looks like quarter sawn. I don't remember seeing any pin knots, but this was from a 36" dia. tree. Gary
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC05899.jpg
Views:	374
Size:	91.9 KB
ID:	43136  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC05901.jpg
Views:	777
Size:	97.3 KB
ID:	43137  

HomeBody is offline  
post #10 of 10 Old 04-18-2012, 12:46 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
nblasa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 281
View nblasa's Photo Album My Photos
thanks for all the input guys. Since posting this thread I've realized that there is so very much that I just didn't know, and I'd like to learn more. Does anyone know of a good book or website with info for people who want to learn more about milling lumber? I'd like to know more about identifying different species, which ones are good for projects or furniture, and what to look for in a tree when deciding if it would be good for milling.
nblasa is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome