cost to have a couple logs sawn into planks - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

 
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post #1 of 14 Old 09-01-2016, 01:59 PM Thread Starter
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cost to have a couple logs sawn into planks

I have around 20 acres of wood with lots of poplar, maple, black gum and cherry. I have been thinking of having some logs sawn into planks, three and four inches thick. I know about making sure there are no nails and wire in the logs. But what is a reasonable price to saw a log into 4 inch live edge slabs. I will do the transportation and planks will get stacked in my barn to dry. and I will wax the ends. I have stickers.

I am trying to work out a deal with the local saw mill to exchange some additional logs for the sawing, but I don't know what the going rate is for the sawing. I want to make some rustic slab benches and use the rest for turning blanks.
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post #2 of 14 Old 09-01-2016, 02:44 PM
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around my parts it goes for $0.50/bd ft.
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post #3 of 14 Old 09-01-2016, 04:51 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks. I know wood is usually by the board foot. Board foot seems like piracy when I am having the guy make substantially fewer cuts than sawing regular boards. Maybe I can talk him into a per hour amount.
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post #4 of 14 Old 09-01-2016, 06:02 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Why not ask the mill opertator?

If you can work out a lineal ft rate or an hourly rate that is satisfactory for both of you, then it really doesn't matter what we think... just sayin'

With an expectation of more business he may offer a reduced rate over a one time job...

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specfic. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo
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post #5 of 14 Old 09-02-2016, 07:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
If you can work out a lineal ft rate or an hourly rate that is satisfactory for both of you, then it really doesn't matter what we think... just sayin'

With an expectation of more business he may offer a reduced rate over a one time job...
Could not agree more.

George
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post #6 of 14 Old 09-06-2016, 10:43 PM
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Where? I charge 0.25 per bf for soft wood and 0.35 per bf for hardwood. I have done the trading deal...and got stuck with a bunch of crap. for one log I usually shoot for $40 for the time spent fooling with one log...I'm in Middle GA tho.

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Lawn Care, Small Engine Repair, Furniture, and Custom Sawing.
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post #7 of 14 Old 09-07-2016, 12:44 AM
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I'm kind of wondering what the cost difference between paying someone to saw down my log(s) vs getting my hands on a decent chain saw and milling it myself. I've watched plenty of videos on the subject so I have a fairly good feel for what's involved. I also know there's going to be considerable loss of wood with the chain saw vs a bandsaw..
The log I'm thinking of cutting up is river birch and I know I'll need a pretty big bar/chain to make the cuts across the log (about 20").. I hope to make a decision before it begins to rot on the ground..

I figured it's time to change my signature so hold your breath. This is it.
Impressive, huh?
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post #8 of 14 Old 09-07-2016, 04:34 AM
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Many saw mills are automated to saw a succession of logs. Sawing your couple will mean more handling and greater expense.
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post #9 of 14 Old 09-07-2016, 07:38 AM
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Originally Posted by allpurpose View Post
I'm kind of wondering what the cost difference between paying someone to saw down my log(s) vs getting my hands on a decent chain saw and milling it myself. I've watched plenty of videos on the subject so I have a fairly good feel for what's involved. I also know there's going to be considerable loss of wood with the chain saw vs a bandsaw..
The log I'm thinking of cutting up is river birch and I know I'll need a pretty big bar/chain to make the cuts across the log (about 20").. I hope to make a decision before it begins to rot on the ground..
This post reads like you think you can do the sawing with just a chain saw and not a chain saw mill.

George
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post #10 of 14 Old 09-07-2016, 10:36 AM Thread Starter
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The local mill guy and I have reached an agreement for $85.00 an hour plus $20 per blade if nails or objects are struck in the wood. But I need to be present with an assistant to stack the slabs on my trailer directly from the band mill . That seems a bit fairer than board ft. The trees I have are back in the woods and are not near where old fences ran. The saw mill guy runs a metal detector over them ahead of time as a precaution. So now I will need to figure which trees and get a fresh sharpened chain on the saw. Already got a place in the barn to stack them and a bunch of stickers. I have a large cherry to be removed anyway, a few fair size sweet birch, some red maple, a black gum and dozens of walnuts I'll use the backhoe to lift the logs onto the trailer I'm thinking some three inch slabs 7 or 8 feet long may be too heavy for two people to lift onto the trailer when cut.
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post #11 of 14 Old 09-08-2016, 11:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
This post reads like you think you can do the sawing with just a chain saw and not a chain saw mill.

George
I guess so George.. I kind of figured that part about the mill would be assumed. I'm not thinking about freehanding it the whole way. Call me old fashioned, but I like having arms and legs. Don't get me wrong..I like pretty nurses and all,but not that much..
I got one quote for about $275 and I'm not convinced that I can buy a substantial enough chain saw and mill for that price much less that much birch lumber..

I figured it's time to change my signature so hold your breath. This is it.
Impressive, huh?
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post #12 of 14 Old 10-12-2016, 03:49 PM
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I deal with local Amish saw mills. Some are just one-man operations running a good sized Wood-Mizer. I get my work done very, very cheaply. Show them cash. Amish LOVE cash.
I bought two, 5 foot long, 20" thick walnut logs and had them cut into slabs for $10. This is purchase price AND having them cut while at the mill. They were "junk" logs, but fine for my projects (rustic furniture).
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post #13 of 14 Old 10-13-2016, 02:58 AM
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Last guy I talked to about it wanted 90 an hour and not in need of lumber for exchange. I think I've given up on the chain saw schtick.. my legs are not up to the task anymore. I run out of juice just cutting the grass on the lawn tractor anymore.. I have some digenerative condition with them so I figure if I'm out there with a chain saw mill I'm going to run out of legs long before I run out of logs..

I figured it's time to change my signature so hold your breath. This is it.
Impressive, huh?
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post #14 of 14 Old 10-13-2016, 12:30 PM
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The cost of a decent mill, the space needed and the time required to air dry is not worth it for most of us. I recently cleared 25 acres by dozer and did not keep a thing. Wasteful? Yes it was. But I don't have the equipment to harvest wood. A lot of these trees had thorns. Mesquite, Hawthorn, Locust, and Boise de Arc. Hard to get a straight piece of lumber from these trees.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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