Ridgid BS1400 band saw - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 21 Old 11-12-2007, 12:58 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 353
View Howard Ferstler's Photo Album My Photos
Ridgid BS1400 band saw

Note: while this review is of the BS1400 model, the owner's manual calls it the BS14002. I do not know if the addition of the number 2 signifies an upgrade or is just the full number not listed correctly in the catalog. The earlier "gray" version might have been the plain, old BS1400. In any case, the one being reviewed here is the orange version seen easily at any Home Depot store, usually selling for about $350.

OK, this is a pretty basic band saw in the old style. It came with the standard metal guide blocks and the usual, right-angle positioned bearing behind the blade. The frame is cast iron, as is the work table. The wheels appear to be cast (not machined) iron, but they seem decently round, and the offset, 3/4-HP induction motor is attached to the lower wheel by means of an automotive type V-belt, shielded by a metal housing. The blade guard and upper guide assembly can be raised or lowered for a maximum cut of 6 inches by means of a single release knob. Ridgid offers a 6-inch extender for those who want the saw to resaw really large boards.

The saw can be wired for either 120- or 240-volt operation. It came configured for the former, and that is where I left things. The manual offers rewireing instructions for a 240-volt hookup. The manual itself is better written than some of the other tool manuals I have seen.

The saw comes with a stand that is decently stiff, with an additional metal sheet under the top surface to stiffen it up a bit. The motor is rubber mounted. Assembling the stand and saw was a relative snap.

I do most of my woodworking out on a deck adjacent to my small shop (I am in north Florida, where this is possible 9 months of the year, with the summer months being just too hot), so I built a wooden platform under the stand, bolted them together, and installed 2.5-inch pivoting wheels on the bottom. This allows me to move the 200 pound assembly easily onto the deck.

OK, now let's get down to the details.

First, the saw vibrated too much out of the box. I discovered that the main offenders were the V-belt and the cast wheels. The belt was, well, junk, with a twist to it and too damned much stiffness. I went to an automotive parts shop and had the clerk (you need a clerk with a good attitude) go into the back and locate a flexible, segmented belt the same length. That solved much of the saw's vibration problem. I have the belt's stock/size number written down somewhere if anybody wants it.

I also installed little clip-on weights to each wheel. To do this accurately you need to remove the blade and V-belt and let gravity swing the wheels down to where the heavy sections are at the bottom. (This operation also allowed one to assess the condition of the wheel bearings.) You then clip the weight on at the top and check again to see if gravity pulls the wheels in any direction after releasing them at different positions. If they do not move they are balanced enough. If things are still off you need larger weights, a second weight, or a smaller weight. I was lucky, and I hit the mark on the first try. This modification solved nearly all of the remaining vibration problem.

I topped off the anti-vibration mods by solidly mounting the motor. Yep, I removed the rubber mounts (which looked like afterthought jokes) and replaced them with a small sheet of properly drilled out 3/4-inch MDF. I also added additional stiffness to the stand's mounting plate by installing an additional and larger sheet of drilled-oout 3/4-inch MDF under the metal surface. Doing this mandated longer mounting screws and large washers below, needless to say. This series of modifications allowed the saw to be butter smooth in its operation. The rubber belts already installed on the wheels were no problem, although I did purchase two spares for future use.

I also replaced the metal guide blocks with some fiber-material "cool blocks" that Ridgid was offering for sale at the time via their phone-order service. In addition, I removed the lower blade guard from the unit, because it appeared to not be needed at all and mainly functioned as a barrier to easily adjusting the lower guide blocks and bearing.

While side-mounted rubbing blocks seem outdated compared to newer-design saws that use bearings in those locations, I believe that the blocks might have one advantage over bearings: they scrape the blade clean as it runs. Bearings might just compress built-up sludge on the blade surface as it runs and gradually pinch it too hard. This is just a theory, of course, with some woods possibly causing more problems than others.

The upper and lower sections of the saw's cast-iron frame are held together by a large nut and bolt, plus large washers. There was space at that junction point for an additional smaller nut and bolt (and rectangular washers that I cut myself), and I installed them to make damned sure that the two sections locked together with little chance of the cast iron being overstressed.

Finally, I expanded the size of the table by adding a wooden frame made out of 2x4 sections around its back edge, right-side, and front edge. The left-side edge got a narrower piece of wood so that the table could still tilt a few degrees in that direction. This wooden frame around the cast-iron table is screwed together and is held in place by additional screws running into the pre-drilled holes in the front and back of the table. The wooden section is kept in cosmetic shape by regular applications of lemon oil. The notch for blade removal in the cast-iron table is continued through the wooden extension section on the right side, with the groove in the wooden pieces held together with a stiff, quick-release crosspiece below. The overall table is now 20 x 18 inches in size, with lines scribed into the wooden extensions to help keep things aligned when doing freehand or fence cuts.

A review I read about the saw said that the optional fence Ridgid offers is not all that good. This is one reason I was not afraid to do the wooden extension modification, since doing it would make it impossible to use the Ridgid fence. I made a fence of my own out of lumber, and if I need a fence I simply hold it in place with clamps, making sure that it is parallel to the lines scribed into the wooden extension sections. Most of my cutting is done freehand, however.

The wooden table expansion does two things. First, it offers a larger work surface. Second, it keeps the edge of the cast-iron table from marring any work pieces.

I removed the 3/8 inch blade that came with the saw and replaced it with a 1/2 incher for better straight-line cutting. For curved cuts that do not involve workpieces that are too large I use a small Ryobi 9-inch model with a 1/4-inch blade. Some of the mods I did on the larger Ridgid model were also done on the smaller Ryobi unit: wood-edged table enlarging and wheel balancing. The little Ryobi is a good saw for craftsman type jobs.

Overall, I think the 14-inch, Ridigid BS14002 model is a good saw, particularly for the $350 that I paid. Yes, I had to work on it a bit to get it up to snuff, but the result is an item that I can use for decently precise work.

Howard Ferstler
Howard Ferstler is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Howard Ferstler For This Useful Post:
JohnnieSpkrTwkr (11-27-2011)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 21 Old 11-12-2007, 02:57 PM
Resident smart a$$!!!
 
Corndog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Vancouver B.C
Posts: 804
View Corndog's Photo Album My Photos
I have the older grey one and I found that when covered in stickers is a MUCH better saw!!!
I really need to get some Cool Blocks for it though.

Corndog is offline  
post #3 of 21 Old 11-15-2007, 01:28 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 353
View Howard Ferstler's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corndog View Post
I have the older grey one and I found that when covered in stickers is a MUCH better saw!!!
I really need to get some Cool Blocks for it though.

Oh, man, those stickers. Wow! How did you get so much sawdust piled up above and below the on/off switch?

One mod I did not mention in my review involved putting a small sheet-metal skirt around the entrance to the dust-collecting port under the table. It helped the DC machine pull more dust away from the table. Still, I cannot see now so much dust would get piled up above and below the on/off switch, even with no DC system at all.

I tried recently to get some additional cool blocks from Ridgid and they said they no longer sell them. They were aftermarket items, and not made by Ridgid or even sold under the Ridgid name.

Howard Ferstler
Howard Ferstler is offline  
post #4 of 21 Old 11-15-2007, 09:48 PM
Resident smart a$$!!!
 
Corndog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Vancouver B.C
Posts: 804
View Corndog's Photo Album My Photos
You know, I have NO idea how the dust piled up there!!!
Best go brush it off, huh???

Last edited by Corndog; 11-15-2007 at 10:00 PM.
Corndog is offline  
post #5 of 21 Old 11-15-2007, 10:09 PM
Resident smart a$$!!!
 
Corndog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Vancouver B.C
Posts: 804
View Corndog's Photo Album My Photos
Instead of Cool Blocks I've been using Dri-Cote. Werks great.
Corndog is offline  
post #6 of 21 Old 01-13-2008, 08:43 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 10
View kknight128's Photo Album My Photos
tires and motor mounts

I had to replace the tires on my saw. They got streched out and kept coming off. I picked up some urathane tires they work much better. The rubber mount let my motor slip so when i was cutting it would stall. I jammed a piece of wood between motor and saw casting for now. just something to keep in mind. Other than that it is a good saw.
kknight128 is offline  
post #7 of 21 Old 01-13-2008, 01:36 PM
"wood be" woodworker
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Mechanicsburg, PA
Posts: 11
View affyx's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks for the review - great ideas on the mods! Does the Ridgid have a brush to clean the wheels? I need to add brushes to my Grizzly 14" and am looking for ideas.

My saw came with bearings and I wish I could swap them out for coolblocks - for the reason you stated, but mainly because it allows you to trap a tiny 1/8" blade for scroll work - the bearings are too big for any blade below 1/4"

Good luck with your saw - I've had mine for about 3 weeks and can't imagine not having a bandsaw in the shop now!

Thanks:
JC

Thanks:
JC

Please check out my blog at http://www.affyx.com
affyx is offline  
post #8 of 21 Old 01-14-2008, 06:21 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 353
View Howard Ferstler's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by affyx View Post
Thanks for the review - great ideas on the mods! Does the Ridgid have a brush to clean the wheels? I need to add brushes to my Grizzly 14" and am looking for ideas.

My saw came with bearings and I wish I could swap them out for coolblocks - for the reason you stated, but mainly because it allows you to trap a tiny 1/8" blade for scroll work - the bearings are too big for any blade below 1/4"

Good luck with your saw - I've had mine for about 3 weeks and can't imagine not having a bandsaw in the shop now!

Thanks:
JC
It has a stiff brush for the lower wheel, but not the upper one. Even so, I like to manually clean the tires after a while.

A bandsaw is kind of a gentleman's saw: far less noisy and dangerous than a table saw, with a degree of class that is unmatched. Still, it cannot crosscut longer boards like a table saw. Come to think of it, I do my crosscutting with a miter saw.

I may have mentioned before that I actually have two bandsaws. The Ridgid does the larger scale work, but I have a small Ryob 9 incher on hand, too, that is used for smaller stuff that is still too large for my scroll saw. (Admittedly, the Ryobi is almost a toy, but it really works quite well.) Both bandsaws are mounted on mobile bases that I can move out onto my work deck. Like the Ridgid, the Ryobi has a wooden extension installed around the standard table.

Although my Ridgid unit has standard blocks, I can see the advantages of bearings, but your point about the standard-type blocks and a small band size is well taken. Normally, I keep a half inch band on the saw, with the Ryobi having a 1/4 incher most of the time. My scroll saw can handle really fine blades, of course.

One thing that continues to fascinate me is the location of the rear bearing behind the blade. One would think that the normal way to do the arrangement would be to have the bearing rotating in parallel with the blade for maximum smoothness. However, the vast bulk of band saws have the bearing turning perpendicular to the blade axis, with the bearing edge handling the pressure. Go figure.

Howard Ferstler
Howard Ferstler is offline  
post #9 of 21 Old 01-15-2008, 03:09 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 353
View Howard Ferstler's Photo Album My Photos
In a private message a correspondent asked me what kind of weights I used to balance the wheels. They sent the message to me via the site's personal message function.

When I tried to reply via the site my computer would not let me compose my message in the reply window. Ironically, I blocked and copied his question with the intension of dropping it here to give everybody an idea of what he asked, specifically. Unfortunately, I could not drop the copy here, either. Well, his question was not complex and involved my technique for installing weights onto the band wheels.

I used small metal clips that had originally been used on the bottom edges of a hi-fi equipment cabinet to serve as cosmetic guides for wheels that had pins that were inserted into holes drilled in the bottom edges of the cabinet side panels. They were ordinary shiny metal that was easy to bend.

I first removed the blade and rubber belt so that the wheels (which have very good bearings) could let gravity settle them out with the heavy section at the bottom of their rotation movements. I then tried the clips and, lo and behold, they were exactly the weights needed to give the wheels neutral balance. If they had not worked I would have tried something else.

The fabricated clips were inserted on the inside edges of the rim webbing after being "crimped" just enough with a large pair of pliers to slide into position very tightly. So far, they have stayed in place just fine, and because they are crimped on the inside webbing edges of each wheel I see no reason why they should ever shift position or come loose.

The correspondent mentioned that some people drill the wheel rims to lighten the heavy part. This would work, but of course there is no way to easily "undrill" a whole.

Whoops, actually, there is. With my small Ryobi band saw (used for smaller scale cutting) I did the balance trick using small nut/bolt combinations temporarily pinched onto the wheel rim (after again removing the blade and drive belt). Once I determined which nut/bolt combination would work I drilled a small hole in the aluminum wheel webbing and installed the bolt. Worked fine. This saw only needed one of the two wheels balanced, interestingly. The other wheel was perfect.

Those with cast-iron wheels might have a bit more of a chore to drill such a hole, of course. I hope the person who contacted me via the personal message function of this site manages to find this reply.

Howard Ferstler
Howard Ferstler is offline  
post #10 of 21 Old 01-15-2008, 05:01 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 353
View Howard Ferstler's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by kknight128 View Post
I had to replace the tires on my saw. They got streched out and kept coming off. I picked up some urathane tires they work much better. The rubber mount let my motor slip so when i was cutting it would stall. I jammed a piece of wood between motor and saw casting for now. just something to keep in mind. Other than that it is a good saw.
As I noted in my review, the rubber motor mounts make no sense at all. The screws can compress the rubber, but the motor still can move way too much for decent stability. As I noted, I installed a rectangular piece of 3/4-inch MDF in place of the rubber pads and also installed a larger rectangular 3/4-inch MDF piece under the sheet-metal top of the stand (in addition to the separate piece of sheet metal already under there), and the result was a really stiff top section and solidly mounted motor. Needless to say, I had to replace the stock mounting bolts with much longer versions for both the motor and the saw's base.

My guess is that the rubber mounts are there to compensate for the junk belt that comes with the unit. Opting for a good, automotive-grade replacement belt eliminates the need for a rubber-mounted motor.

I did purchase a spare set of tires from Ridgid for future use when the originals wear out. The ones on the saw now seem just fine, however. I suppose that QC issues explain why some people have more trouble with the stock tires than others. Another thing to take into consideration is the tension of the blade, which might impact tire integrity. There are all sorts of techniques printed in woodworking magazines about how to properly tension the blade. However, I find that if you loosen it to the point where it starts to not cut true or acts funny and then tighten it a bit things work out just fine. With my particular unit I have the thing tightened to the 3/8 inch mark on the blade-tension scale, even though I am using a 1/2 inch blade.

So far, so good.

PS: One other point. As I recall when installing the replacement belt, the drive wheel on the motor is held in place on the motor shaft by a small screw. I think one needs to be careful to not overtighten that screw when fooing with the wheel. The threads might strip. And one might need to fool with the wheel when getting it aligned with the other belt wheel attached to the blade wheel inside of the cabinet. If it is out of alignment that might account for some of the vibration some users get when using the saw.

Howard Ferstler
Howard Ferstler is offline  
post #11 of 21 Old 02-22-2008, 05:57 PM
Senior Member
 
Marko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Shooting Creek,NC
Posts: 225
View Marko's Photo Album My Photos
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by affyx View Post
Thanks for the review - great ideas on the mods! Does the Ridgid have a brush to clean the wheels? I need to add brushes to my Grizzly 14" and am looking for ideas.

My saw came with bearings and I wish I could swap them out for coolblocks - for the reason you stated, but mainly because it allows you to trap a tiny 1/8" blade for scroll work - the bearings are too big for any blade below 1/4"

Good luck with your saw - I've had mine for about 3 weeks and can't imagine not having a bandsaw in the shop now!

Thanks:
JC

Here's a link to a tire brush

http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?FamilyID=5321
Marko is offline  
post #12 of 21 Old 02-23-2008, 09:12 PM
"wood be" woodworker
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Mechanicsburg, PA
Posts: 11
View affyx's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks Marko!

Thanks:
JC

Please check out my blog at http://www.affyx.com
affyx is offline  
post #13 of 21 Old 05-12-2009, 09:29 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 11
View pdiesel's Photo Album My Photos
I know this is an old thread and review, but I want to give my experience with the Ridgid Bandsaw. I did NOT find any vibration after assembly. My saw has worked flawless right out of the box. I did not have to modify mine. I did put mine on wheels to make it more mobile, but that is it. If you are looking for a very capable bandsaw at an affordable price, you could do a lot worse than this saw!
pdiesel is offline  
post #14 of 21 Old 06-13-2009, 06:38 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 353
View Howard Ferstler's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdiesel View Post
I know this is an old thread and review, but I want to give my experience with the Ridgid Bandsaw. I did NOT find any vibration after assembly. My saw has worked flawless right out of the box. I did not have to modify mine. I did put mine on wheels to make it more mobile, but that is it. If you are looking for a very capable bandsaw at an affordable price, you could do a lot worse than this saw!
Yes, I would imagine that there are variations from sample to sample, and you lucked out and got one that needed no work. There are probably scads of other woodworkers who lucked out like you did. It is a good saw.

I have attached a photo of the one I reviewed, showing the worktable mod that made the surface bigger. The wooden rim also reduces the chance of the cast iron table edge dinging a fragile workpiece. You can kiind of see that the motor is bolted to a solid piece of (painted) mdf to give the drive train more stability. The undercariage also has a thick piece of mdf underneath to stiffen up the entire mounting platform. Of course, doing all of this required using longer machine screws.

Howard Ferstler
Attached Images
 
Howard Ferstler is offline  
post #15 of 21 Old 12-03-2009, 03:51 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 3
View Leland's Photo Album My Photos
Ridged Band Saw/Which Riser Block

Leland here. I'm new to this site and am not sure if this is the palce to post this question. I do have a question about the Ridgid BS14002 saw.
I want to put a riser block on my saw. Ridgids price is 200 or better. Now some folks say that the Jet model #708717 (Catalog #961137, Woodcraft) will fit. Does anyone know anything about this? Please let me know.
Thank You
Leland
Leland is offline  
post #16 of 21 Old 12-03-2009, 06:52 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Park Forest, Il
Posts: 775
View Julian the woodnut's Photo Album My Photos
I used the one available from grizzly. I think it was around $60. If you do a little google searching, you'll find out exactly which model number you need.
Julian the woodnut is offline  
post #17 of 21 Old 11-27-2011, 12:49 AM
Amateur Woodworker
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: North of Boston, MA
Posts: 1
View JohnnieSpkrTwkr's Photo Album My Photos
Dear Mr. Ferstler,I just wanted to say how much I appreciated your taking the time to write a detailed & thorough review of this tool, 1 of which I spotted today at my local Sears on clearance for $229. Your unvarnished assessment made the difference in my decision to buy it. The vibration mods you undertook along with the handsome & practical table expansion are well within my capabilities, making this good value and right-sized at my modest budget & level of expertise. Well done, sir. Regards, John H.
JohnnieSpkrTwkr is offline  
post #18 of 21 Old 11-27-2011, 08:55 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 353
View Howard Ferstler's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnieSpkrTwkr View Post
Dear Mr. Ferstler,I just wanted to say how much I appreciated your taking the time to write a detailed & thorough review of this tool, 1 of which I spotted today at my local Sears on clearance for $229. Your unvarnished assessment made the difference in my decision to buy it. The vibration mods you undertook along with the handsome & practical table expansion are well within my capabilities, making this good value and right-sized at my modest budget & level of expertise. Well done, sir. Regards, John H.
Glad you enjoyed the review. That is a great price you are getting the unit for, and with a bit of diddling the saw will work just fine for you.

I know that some here have complained about the product, but most of what they are complaining about can be fixed cheap and easy.

Some people just like to complain.

Howard Ferstler
Howard Ferstler is offline  
post #19 of 21 Old 12-22-2011, 11:46 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1
View Billybojangels's Photo Album My Photos
I just purchased this bandsaw need info for setting up

I like this post. Makes me feel that I might be able to turn this old used saw into a good working one. Do you have any pictures of the construction of the table extension? what is the part number for the belt you used? where do I find the counter weights? any suggestions about how I might be able to adapt a resaw guide / Fence to this with the home made table extension? and lastly, the saw I have has some rust on the metal surface of the table, what is the best way to clean that up, (hand sanding or power sanding?, steel wool, solvents? ) any suggestions would be appreciated.
Billybojangels is offline  
post #20 of 21 Old 12-23-2011, 07:06 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 353
View Howard Ferstler's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billybojangels View Post
I like this post. Makes me feel that I might be able to turn this old used saw into a good working one. Do you have any pictures of the construction of the table extension? what is the part number for the belt you used? where do I find the counter weights? any suggestions about how I might be able to adapt a resaw guide / Fence to this with the home made table extension? and lastly, the saw I have has some rust on the metal surface of the table, what is the best way to clean that up, (hand sanding or power sanding?, steel wool, solvents? ) any suggestions would be appreciated.
I wish I had better photos, but the only one I have on my computer right now is the one I already posted.

The wood pieces are simply sections cut out of of a standard 2x4 piece of timber, drilled so that long machine screws could hold them in place. I wanted to use the tapped holes in the cast-iron table itself, but I could not find thin metric bolts long enough to do the job. So, I drilled them out a bit larger and used long conventional machine screws with nuts on the inside. I had to build a special groove into the section that fits across the cut in the table that allows for blade removal. There is a brace underneath that wooden, two-piece section that holds them together. To replace the blade the brace is removed (bolts hold it to the cross piece), and the blade is swapped out in the usual manner.

Almost any technique will work when doing something like this. For example, it might be just fine to simply install a wooden board on top of the cast-iron table, with home-built clamps underneath to hold it in place. This would move the cutting surface further from the lower guide bearings than some might like, however, even if the board was only .75-inch thick. It would also reduce resaw clearance.

I would imagine that anybody with woodworking skills good enough to make use of good woodworking tools would be able to fabricate a table mod like mine with little more than a bit of experimentation. At least wood like that is cheap.

The belt stock number escapes me, but the best way to find a proper size is to take the factory-supplied belt to an auto-parts store and have the clerk find one that fits. They do that with car-repair situations all the time.

The best way to balance the wheels is to go to a tire shop and purchase some small wheel-balancing weights. Heck, they probably will give them to you. I had some metal clips on hand that were for installing wheels on carts, and so getting items like that would be impossible for you to do. I just lucked out on their having the correct weight. My guess is that auto wheel weights would have to be the lightest ones they have in stock at the tire shop.

Getting rust off of a cast-iron table is something I have not had to deal with, so my guess is as good as yours in this area. Some others here may have some good suggestions.

PS: I modify nearly all of my tools. It gives me something to do between woodworking projects. I even have replaced most of the rubber-covered and plastic knobs on my power tools with ones turned from wood. (The band saw also got this treatment, but the photo was taken before the cosmetic work.) Once stained and clearcoated they add a bit of class to tools that are essentially pretty mundane looking. No improvement in performance has resulted, unfortunately.

Howard Ferstler

Last edited by Howard Ferstler; 12-23-2011 at 07:09 PM.
Howard Ferstler is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Anyone have a Ridgid TP1300LS planer? firefighteremt153 Power Tools & Machinery 8 09-09-2009 06:25 PM
Please tell me what you think of this Ridgid Table Saw lobos3737 Power Tools & Machinery 19 02-10-2009 01:18 AM
Ridgid, Grizzly... others apthiry Power Tools & Machinery 6 09-24-2008 11:00 PM
Ridgid Planer TP1300LS TS3660 Tool Reviews 3 08-11-2008 10:45 PM
Ridgid TS-3650 vs 3660 RJAngel Power Tools & Machinery 2 03-26-2008 07:21 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome