Weight of 1 x pine - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 9 Old 02-20-2012, 08:40 AM Thread Starter
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Weight of 1 x pine

Does anyone know how much a standard Big Box store 1 x 4 x 8' weighs? I'm trying to do some calculating and found several different weights online anywhere from 35 lbs. to 70 lbs. per cubic foot. I tend to think 35 is correct but does anyone know? 35 would put a 1 x 4 x 8' at 5.104 lbs., assuming it is 3/4" x 3 1/2" x 8'.

Here's the issue: I built some apple boxes out of 3/4" birch plywood. The entire assembled project is 13.5 sq. ft. It is heavy. Too heavy. So, I'm considering making the next one out of 1 x pine material. But by my calculations, this will only save 2 lbs. or so. That just seems wrong. I haven't actually weighed the box assembly I built but if I calculate 3/4 baltic birch to 3/4 pine, the plywood weighs 31 lbs. and the pine weighs 29 lbs.

Bud

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post #2 of 9 Old 02-20-2012, 09:21 AM
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It would depend on moisture content. I have some reclaimed pine that was used to for siding on a barn that is now so light it feels like balsa wood. Just my opinion, but I think 5 lbs on a 1x4 might be a little high.

Maybe consider going to 1/2" material instead of 3/4" to save some weight.
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post #3 of 9 Old 02-20-2012, 09:21 AM
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Depends on how wet the wood is, technically. Would 1/2" or 3/8 material work? 3/4 anything weighs a ton. You so just beat me to that. Lol

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post #4 of 9 Old 02-20-2012, 09:43 AM
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12" x 12" x3/4" pine

A piece 12 x 12 x 3/4 weighs about 1.5 lbs, dry #2 pine.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specfic. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo
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post #5 of 9 Old 02-20-2012, 10:41 AM
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Check this link out.

http://www.woodweb.com/cgi-bin/calcu...r=weight_bd_ft

You can choose the type of lumber and moisture content.

Check out some of my custom stairs
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post #6 of 9 Old 02-20-2012, 03:20 PM
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Bud,
The only problem that i see is that the BORG pine varies all over the place in moisture content. And the sap varies from nonexistent to "I don't want to pick up that stuff".

I think if it were me, I would use 1/4" baltic birch (25 square feet per sheet and probably 2 boxes per sheet.) as you can pick up a sheet by pinching it with your fingers. And then get some good KD 2x4 from Lowe's. Out here they are "white wood" rather dry and light. Rip the 2x4 to reinforce the corner joints of your apple boxes. (3/4 x 3/4) Seems like you could get the box weight down to 10 pounds or so.

But the big question... Apple boxes says to me, out in the fields, poor treatment, wet environment... Baltic birch ain't going to stand up to the weather very well.

Another consideration...Take the KD 2x4 and slice it up to make the boxes. Off of each edge, cut 1/4", yielding 2 pieces 1 1/2 by 1/4. Then cut 2 more 1/4 pieces off of each face, yielding 2 pieces 2 3/4 by 1/4 and one piece 3/4 x 2 3/4. Five of these 3/4 x 2 3/4 pieces glued together would give you the ends of a nice deep box almost 14" deep. The 1/4 pieces cut off would give the bottom and sides. The advantage of these cuts is that the wood would be smooth enough for gluing and making apple crates. As a bonus, all of these cuts could be made with a 10" table saw.

Use the right tool for the job.

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post #7 of 9 Old 02-20-2012, 03:30 PM Thread Starter
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Good thoughts rrich. Thanks. I'm still mulling over options. And as far as where the boxes will be, I think mostly inside and dry. I'm leaning toward using 1 x for the two sides and fronts and backs, and using 1/2 A/C plywood for the tops & bottoms. The problem with using 1/2 ply for the sides, F & B, is that I need to glue and nail the tops and bottoms to them. Nails into plywood edge don't hold as I'm sure you know. So, maybe I can make small 45 degree corner, top & bottom gussets. But then the labor goes way up. I dunno. Lots of way I can make them and none of them seem good. lol

Bud

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post #8 of 9 Old 02-21-2012, 04:39 PM
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i am having a similar problem right now. I have to make liquor crates, a lot of them, prohibition era. I need two styles, one that can be danced on, but still be lifted, and one that is lightweight for someone to carry around on stage without any real effort. I like the feel of 1/2" ply, but the end grain is not desirable. I made some out of clear pine, but they weight too much by far, even though they looked great.

So two questions.

How much more should clear pine weigh than knotty pine, percentage wise on average, I can't find moisture content on it.

Can anyone suggest a good option for lightweight, yet still strong, and not end grain without mitering ever little piece.

Just some questions.
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post #9 of 9 Old 02-21-2012, 08:26 PM
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Acrylic, mdf, balsa for light weight.

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