seal outdoor wood table? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 43 Old 07-14-2008, 09:14 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 8
View annie68164's Photo Album My Photos
Cool seal outdoor wood table?

I just built and stained a pine table for my patio. Do I need to seal it? If so, with what? Minwax clear? It's not green treated so I don't know if it will rot if I don't add a final sealant. thanks!
annie68164 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 43 Old 07-15-2008, 11:02 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 373
View jerry's Photo Album My Photos
You have one of the worst woods for our door use.

Jerry
jerry is offline  
post #3 of 43 Old 07-15-2008, 01:05 PM
Member
 
Trappeur's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Blue Ridge, Georgia
Posts: 82
View Trappeur's Photo Album My Photos
Hi Annie,
I wish I could help you in your question but don't really know the proper answer. The answer that Jerry just gave you I know is what you were not looking for but surely someone will come along and see this post and make a suggestion of what to do. I do know that plain untreated will not hold up..Hopefully the table you could use elsewhere, maybe on a covered porch area or maybe somewhere in your house? If not and you keep outside, hopefully your table was not an extravagant piece that you made with many hours put into it and you could put some type of sealer, finisher on it and enjoy it with the life expectancy it will have....
Sorry I wasn't much help.

Trappeur
Trappeur is offline  
post #4 of 43 Old 07-15-2008, 02:07 PM
Heavy Sander
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: East Virginia
Posts: 152
View Capt Crutch's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerry View Post
You have one of the worst woods for our door use.
Unless the pine was yellow, in which case it's one of the better woods for outdoor use.

Even if it is white pine, it can still hold up just fine if it's finished properly. Shipbuilders used white pine for ship's masts for centuries, and many of them are still in service.

And around here, people still use yellow pine for the hulls of workboats. Works just fine.

To answer your question, Annie, I would seek out a urethane or polyurethane finish containing UV (ultraviolet) blockers. Sunlight tears up the finish on exterior stuff faster than anything else, so you want something with a stout UV blocker. Akzo Nobel makes a product called Cetol for marine use which holds up very well, but it doesn't look that great. Other stuff looks better but doesn't hold up as well or as long. It's a trade-off, usually, as with most things. If it gets a lot of sunlight, you'll probably need to refinish every few years, regardless. Good luck.

Last edited by Capt Crutch; 07-15-2008 at 02:12 PM.
Capt Crutch is offline  
post #5 of 43 Old 07-16-2008, 05:31 AM
Senior Member
 
Davet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 174
View Davet's Photo Album My Photos
There are a lot of people using pine for outside furniture now.
If you notice most picnic tables now have pine tops.
The thought is.. to get away from the chemical laden-ed pressure treated wood. Pressure treated also has a tendency to split as it gets older.

I have made outdoor things made of pine and they held up pretty good if painted and if put away in the winter so it is not left to the elements.

But since you stained it:
You may heed the wisdom of Capt Crunch and go with polyurethane finish containing UV (ultraviolet) blockers or some sort of marine varnish.

If left unfinished, the pine won't last long out in the elements.

Last edited by Davet; 07-16-2008 at 05:37 AM.
Davet is offline  
post #6 of 43 Old 07-16-2008, 10:58 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Powell River British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 2,279
View Gerry KIERNAN's Photo Album My Photos
I would be inclined to use a penetrating seal, rather than a hard surface finish, such as urethane. Most hard finishes will break down with time and exposure, which means refinishing the piece every few years.
Gerry
Gerry KIERNAN is offline  
post #7 of 43 Old 07-17-2008, 09:07 AM
Wood Butcher
 
Evil Scotsman's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Philadelphia Pa M-F Bernville Pa S-S April - November
Posts: 95
View Evil Scotsman's Photo Album My Photos
Forgive me for Hijacking your post, but I have a question on this matter and thought it would be better to ask in an active thread. IF outdoor furniture is made of pine, (read as cheap/inexpensive, easy to work with for newbies) and is NOT just sitting out over the winter what would be your best guestimation for longevity? What would be considered an oil penatrating finish? I would like to make some outdoor furniture as my begining projects, but I want to make it from Pine, I know it won't last very long but it is "kind of" my only option right now. It would be stored outside but up on a porch with a tarp over it. ? Thanks Once Again!

Some people are like Slinkys.
Not really good for anything.....
But they still bring a smile to your face
when you push them down a flight of stairs.
Evil Scotsman is offline  
post #8 of 43 Old 07-18-2008, 10:01 AM
Heavy Sander
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: East Virginia
Posts: 152
View Capt Crutch's Photo Album My Photos
Scotsman - If I were you, I would drive south an hour or two and find a sawmill that cuts southern loblolly pine. You can typically buy it for around 60/bf and it will hold up much better than white pine in exterior use. I know there are sawmills in Salisbury MD that cut it, you may even find some as far north as Dover, DE for all I know (Wikipedia claims it grows in South Jersey!)...it's also very straight, stable and strong. Also - If you tarp it, I would make sure it wasn't tarped too tightly, as you want air circulation. Finally, unless you plan to use a tablecloth or whatever, I don't know how happy you're going to be with a penetrating versus a clear topcoat finish, because dirt and soot and pollen and mold and God-knows-what-else are going to build up into a funky kind of gurve on the surface, eventually, and you'll have a hard time cleaning it off. With a clear topcoat, at least you can wash/rinse it with a soapy rag/brush and hose, and then eat off the table without getting grossed out...just my 2...

Last edited by Capt Crutch; 07-18-2008 at 10:08 AM.
Capt Crutch is offline  
post #9 of 43 Old 07-18-2008, 10:54 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: KY
Posts: 116
View WDChew's Photo Album My Photos
Scotsman: You should be able to find cypress or white oak reasonably priced in your area. Both have high levels of tannin which makes them naturally rot resistant.

One other recommendation on finishing outdoor furniture...what ever sealer/finish you choose, put about 1/4 inch in small containers and set the legs in them for several minutes. The end grain will wick up the finish. It will do the same thing to water outside if they aren't sealed.
WDChew is offline  
post #10 of 43 Old 07-18-2008, 02:12 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 8
View annie68164's Photo Album My Photos
Wink thanks all!

I ended up buying a Spar marine varnish. I know pine isn't the best wood choice but I already had the table top and I ended up using pine 2x2s for legs. (the table is fairly small) It's not perfectly sturdy which is dissapointing but I basically spent less than $20 on the project and it looks like a $200 table. It's under a roofed porch so sunlight would be on it just a few hours a day. Also, I am a beginner who wants to get in plenty of "practice" before spending big money on cedar or other proper outdoor woods. My next project is a play structure for my kids that I will attempt to build next summer. That one should be a real challenge! :)

Last edited by annie68164; 03-09-2009 at 08:52 AM.
annie68164 is offline  
post #11 of 43 Old 07-18-2008, 02:14 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 8
View annie68164's Photo Album My Photos
Love WDCHEW's idea about soaking the leg ends in the finish, never thought of that but will certainly do it- excellent idea!!!!
annie68164 is offline  
post #12 of 43 Old 07-18-2008, 02:19 PM
Wood Butcher
 
Evil Scotsman's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Philadelphia Pa M-F Bernville Pa S-S April - November
Posts: 95
View Evil Scotsman's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie68164 View Post
Love WDCHEW's idea about soaking the leg ends in the finish, never thought of that but will certainly do it- excellent idea!!!!
I agree GREAT idea, I actually saw in on HGTV or DIY maybe even a magazine. THANKS Will look for 'GOOD" wood this weekend.

Cheers

Some people are like Slinkys.
Not really good for anything.....
But they still bring a smile to your face
when you push them down a flight of stairs.
Evil Scotsman is offline  
post #13 of 43 Old 07-18-2008, 02:26 PM
Wood Butcher
 
Evil Scotsman's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Philadelphia Pa M-F Bernville Pa S-S April - November
Posts: 95
View Evil Scotsman's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt Crutch View Post
Scotsman - If I were you, I would drive south an hour or two and find a sawmill that cuts southern loblolly pine. You can typically buy it for around 60/bf and it will hold up much better than white pine in exterior use. I know there are sawmills in Salisbury MD that cut it, you may even find some as far north as Dover, DE for all I know (Wikipedia claims it grows in South Jersey!)...it's also very straight, stable and strong. Also - If you tarp it, I would make sure it wasn't tarped too tightly, as you want air circulation. Finally, unless you plan to use a tablecloth or whatever, I don't know how happy you're going to be with a penetrating versus a clear topcoat finish, because dirt and soot and pollen and mold and God-knows-what-else are going to build up into a funky kind of gurve on the surface, eventually, and you'll have a hard time cleaning it off. With a clear topcoat, at least you can wash/rinse it with a soapy rag/brush and hose, and then eat off the table without getting grossed out...just my 2...
Aye Aye Capt, thanks for the info on the loblolly pine, (never heard of it before) and even more so for the info on the penetrating vs clear coat. Wifey wouldn NOT be happy with grime embedded into the table she can't clean off Thanks

Some people are like Slinkys.
Not really good for anything.....
But they still bring a smile to your face
when you push them down a flight of stairs.
Evil Scotsman is offline  
post #14 of 43 Old 07-20-2008, 11:18 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Alabama
Posts: 132
View crafter1956's Photo Album My Photos
This would also be a very good choice- I use it myself. http://www.minwax.com/products/oil_b...r_urethane.cfm
crafter1956 is offline  
post #15 of 43 Old 07-21-2008, 10:57 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 373
View jerry's Photo Album My Photos
That is probably one of the worst finishes ever put into a can.

Jerry
jerry is offline  
post #16 of 43 Old 07-21-2008, 12:03 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Powell River British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 2,279
View Gerry KIERNAN's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerry View Post
That is probably one of the worst finishes ever put into a can.

Jerry
Please enlighten us. What specific problems have you had?

Gerry
Gerry KIERNAN is offline  
post #17 of 43 Old 07-21-2008, 07:01 PM
Heavy Sander
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: East Virginia
Posts: 152
View Capt Crutch's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerry View Post
You have one of the worst woods for our door use.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerry View Post
That is probably one of the worst finishes ever put into a can.
Hey, but at least they'll match, right???
Capt Crutch is offline  
post #18 of 43 Old 07-22-2008, 09:40 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 8
View annie68164's Photo Album My Photos
Yes, if the finish is no good, tell us why so we know what to avoid or what consequences we'll face...
annie68164 is offline  
post #19 of 43 Old 07-22-2008, 09:41 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 8
View annie68164's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt Crutch View Post
Hey, but at least they'll match, right???
Ha Ha!
annie68164 is offline  
post #20 of 43 Old 07-22-2008, 11:12 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 373
View jerry's Photo Album My Photos
Polyurethane resin varnish is not what you want to use outside, it yellows quickly,begins to crack and will actually flake off. Spar varnish is a long oil varnish that was originally used on the masts of wooden ships because it was soft and would give a little before it cracked,while this may have been helpful at one time it doesn't offer a lot of protection and must be maintained yearly-atleast. Put the two together and the problems are compounded. It might be a good idea to investigate other places to find out what they think about other finishes as well.

Jerry
++++++++++++++
jerry is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Best type of wood for an outdoor shower? bsharp General Woodworking Discussion 15 06-09-2015 11:18 AM
Wood suggestion for outdoor chairs in MO sander General Woodworking Discussion 9 10-27-2011 03:35 PM
Seal and Heat Wood groover General Woodworking Discussion 6 09-19-2008 07:17 PM
What to do with this slice... Seal it first? ecologito Forestry & Milling 18 07-02-2008 10:58 AM
Removing Anchor seal Ohio Ron General Woodworking Discussion 0 01-02-2008 05:05 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome