Recommended Air Pressure For New Nail Gun - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 24 Old 05-13-2012, 12:43 PM Thread Starter
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Question Recommended Air Pressure For New Nail Gun

In the past I have done all my assembly with my Paslode Cordless 16 and 18 -Gauge nail guns but I thought I had better step up to the plate and get a air nailer. Just this morning bought a Ridgid 18-gauge nailer; 5/8 - 2-1/8. So far, past last hour, it seems to be a good purchase. But I did notice one thing...the air pressure recommendations on the nail gun is 70-120 psi. My compressor puts out about 190 psi. Do I need to put some sort of regulator on a dedicated line for my current and soon to be nail guns? If not will the extra pressure do harm to the guns?

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Tim

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post #2 of 24 Old 05-13-2012, 01:24 PM
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My compressor puts out about 190 psi. Do I need to put some sort of regulator on a dedicated line for my current and soon to be nail guns? If not will the extra pressure do harm to the guns?

Thanks

Tim
Yes, high pressure can blow out seals. Operating pressure @ 90 PSI is common for many air tools. So, you do need to have a regulated line for them.






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post #3 of 24 Old 05-13-2012, 01:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcreek View Post
In the past I have done all my assembly with my Paslode Cordless 16 and 18 -Gauge nail guns but I thought I had better step up to the plate and get a air nailer. Just this morning bought a Ridgid 18-gauge nailer; 5/8 - 2-1/8. So far, past last hour, it seems to be a good purchase. But I did notice one thing...the air pressure recommendations on the nail gun is 70-120 psi. My compressor puts out about 190 psi. Do I need to put some sort of regulator on a dedicated line for my current and soon to be nail guns? If not will the extra pressure do harm to the guns?

Thanks

Tim
Hi Tim - you really don't want to exceed the 120 psi max recommended on the gun. My compressor has two guages, one for tank pressure which is 150 psi, and one for line pressure, which has a knob to adjust. I generally keep line pressure at 95-100 for most of my work but turn it up to 120 for the framing nailer and down to about 40 for inflating tires and such. If your compressor is not equipped with a line regulator, I would strongly recommend installing one. Very few tools use more than 120 psi, sandblasting equipment is about the only thing I can think of off hand that wants pressures in the 150+ range.

John

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post #4 of 24 Old 05-13-2012, 02:18 PM
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Do I understand that you now have an air compressor and it does not have a regulator? I do not think I have ever seen an air compressor sold that did not have a regulator as part of the package.

As stated above, YES, you do need a regulator. I cannot think of any use for a compressor that does not require regulation, except for just blowing air.

I normally run my brad guns at about 6o psi. I will lower that some if working in thin wood and want to make sure not to drive the nails through the wood.

George
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post #5 of 24 Old 05-13-2012, 03:52 PM Thread Starter
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Do I understand that you now have an air compressor and it does not have a regulator? I do not think I have ever seen an air compressor sold that did not have a regulator as part of the package.

As stated above, YES, you do need a regulator. I cannot think of any use for a compressor that does not require regulation, except for just blowing air.

I normally run my brad guns at about 6o psi. I will lower that some if working in thin wood and want to make sure not to drive the nails through the wood.

George
Hey George...yes my AC does have a regulator on it but I wasnt wanting to turn it down just to meet my nail guns needs. After posting this I did turn it down to 80lbs and did notice that my new nail gun was working as should when I was using the nail-depth function on the gun with the appropriate pressure.

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post #6 of 24 Old 05-13-2012, 05:03 PM
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As stated above, YES, you do need a regulator. I cannot think of any use for a compressor that does not require regulation, except for just blowing air.

I normally run my brad guns at about 6o psi. I will lower that some if working in thin wood and want to make sure not to drive the nails through the wood.

George
+2. I only use between 50 and 60 pounds for pin nails and brads to prevent them blowing through thinner woods.

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post #7 of 24 Old 05-13-2012, 06:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcreek View Post
Hey George...yes my AC does have a regulator on it but I wasnt wanting to turn it down just to meet my nail guns needs. After posting this I did turn it down to 80lbs and did notice that my new nail gun was working as should when I was using the nail-depth function on the gun with the appropriate pressure.
Your regulator probably regulates the the tank pressure. If I were you, I'd get another one to regulate the line pressure. That will be much more useful in the future. It will save the compressor from cycling on and off so many times.

Gene
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post #8 of 24 Old 05-13-2012, 08:25 PM
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I usually run around 90# but you may want to dial back a little if you're oversetting the brads.
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post #9 of 24 Old 05-13-2012, 09:58 PM
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Wow, 190 is outrageous, that could kill someone. What do you need that much for? I can’t think of anything that would require that much. I have mine set at 90 and they limited us at work to 60 for safety reasons.

OH I just saw that you turned it down to 80, Thats a much safer pressure.

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I just like to build with wood and a means to save money by doing it myself.
I've been building things out of wood for 40 years and I'm still just an amateur.

Last edited by Sleeper; 05-13-2012 at 10:03 PM.
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post #10 of 24 Old 05-13-2012, 10:50 PM
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I would just pick up an in-line reg. Then split your main into two separate lines one reg'd and one straight, that way if you need 190 psi (god have mercy) you have it and you have 90 psi (the sainer side of life) for your nailers. Just make sure you read the white pages on the second regulator so you know how much pressure difference there needs to be between them so that the second will seat properly. Also having the two regs is a good call because as mentioned in an earlier post it will keep the AC from constantly cycling on and off due to the low tank pressure. Most in-line regulators also come with a filter/water collector so your tools run a little cleaner and drier. All around, reg's are helpful in my opinion.
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post #11 of 24 Old 05-14-2012, 10:20 AM
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I have In-Line Regulators with water fileters on all my nailers.(4). Cost about $12 to make em from Harbor Freight. You could make just one and swap it between guns. Constists of a femal chuck, regulator and inline filter. About 6" long.
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post #12 of 24 Old 05-14-2012, 10:51 AM
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Definitely need a inline regulator, I would put a "T" at the output of the compressor then put the regulator on one side and set it for desired pressure for the nail guns.

Bob making sawdust in SW Louisiana
with a EX-21
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post #13 of 24 Old 05-14-2012, 11:13 AM
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Here's a suggestion for setting up. Most hobbyists don't have a lot of room for a compressor, or will have a long interior run for airline piping.

For small areas, running piping as shown in the drawing below, can be done in a restricted amount of space, and give some run to allow some cooling, and drains to trap and evacuate condensation.

Mounting a filter on the compressor is not that effective. At the end of the piping, mount your filters, and regulators (if more than one of each is needed).

Recommended Air Pressure For New Nail Gun-aircomp.jpg





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post #14 of 24 Old 05-14-2012, 11:36 AM Thread Starter
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Here's a suggestion for setting up. Most hobbyists don't have a lot of room for a compressor, or will have a long interior run for airline piping.

For small areas, running piping as shown in the drawing below, can be done in a restricted amount of space, and give some run to allow some cooling, and drains to trap and evacuate condensation.

Mounting a filter on the compressor is not that effective. At the end of the piping, mount your filters, and regulators (if more than one of each is needed).

Attachment 44509





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Thanks for illustration!!

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post #15 of 24 Old 05-14-2012, 12:00 PM
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I ran schedule 40 PVC pipe throughout my garage 10 to 15 years ago after seeing in the loco tire shop. It was real easy to install and I’ve never had a problem. I was thinking it was Sch 80, but after looking at it, I realized that my memory is not what it used to be.

I bought HF quick connect fittings for all the outlets, but then I realized that all air fitting are not alike. The one I bought at HD did not fit very well in the HF connectors and would leak and sometimes blow out.

I only have one quick connect regulator that I move from place to place. I also added shutoff valves because the cheep HF connectors leak.


JohnnyB
"I do what I do well, but I still like to dabble in what I donít do well"
I just like to build with wood and a means to save money by doing it myself.
I've been building things out of wood for 40 years and I'm still just an amateur.

Last edited by Sleeper; 05-14-2012 at 12:25 PM. Reason: Made a mistake on PSI
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post #16 of 24 Old 05-14-2012, 12:38 PM
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I ran schedule 40 PVC pipe throughout my garage 10 to 15 years ago after seeing in the loco tire shop. It was real easy to install and Iíve never had a problem. I was thinking it was Sch 80, but after looking at it, I realized that my memory is not what it used to be.

I bought HF quick connect fittings for all the outlets, but then I realized that all air fitting are not alike. The one I bought at HD did not fit very well in the HF connectors and would leak and sometimes blow out.

I only have one quick connect regulator that I move from place to place. I also added shutoff valves because the cheep HF connectors leak.

I would not recommend running airline with PVC. Galvanized pipe would be better. If you have it in your piggy bank, use copper.

PVC, can crack/explode. When it does, pieces and shards of pipe fly anywhere and everywhere. They can cause serious injury...not to mention the noise when exploding. A bit louder than my .357.





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post #17 of 24 Old 05-14-2012, 12:52 PM
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I would not recommend running airline with PVC. Galvanized pipe would be better. If you have it in your piggy bank, use copper.

PVC, can crack/explode. When it does, pieces and shards of pipe fly anywhere and everywhere. They can cause serious injury...not to mention the noise when exploding. A bit louder than my .357.





.
Well maybe at 190PSI like was mentioned earlier, but Iím here to tell you after 15 years my PVC is just fine and that tire shop with 6 bays and maybe 20 employees are still using the same PVC pipe after 20 years. Actually since then Iíve seen a lot of shops using PVC.
I have to say that I was skeptical at first and wanted the Sch 80, but after realizing that it wasnít available locally, I gave the Sch 40 a try and Iím very happy with it.

JohnnyB
"I do what I do well, but I still like to dabble in what I donít do well"
I just like to build with wood and a means to save money by doing it myself.
I've been building things out of wood for 40 years and I'm still just an amateur.
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post #18 of 24 Old 05-14-2012, 01:09 PM
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Well maybe at 190PSI like was mentioned earlier, but Iím here to tell you after 15 years my PVC is just fine and that tire shop with 6 bays and maybe 20 employees are still using the same PVC pipe after 20 years. Actually since then Iíve seen a lot of shops using PVC.
I have to say that I was skeptical at first and wanted the Sch 80, but after realizing that it wasnít available locally, I gave the Sch 40 a try and Iím very happy with it.
I don't make this stuff up. I used PVC until I had my first "explosion". Here is some reading material:
http://www.ehow.com/list_7263981_osh...ir-lines_.html
http://www.osha.gov/dts/hib/hib_data/hib19880520.html
http://forum.eastwood.com/showthread...nes-are-deadly!!





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post #19 of 24 Old 05-14-2012, 01:23 PM
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I’ve read all that stuff and from what I’ve read it seems that problems were from pressures over 100 psi and a lot people who would befit from the sales and installation of the more expensive steel and iron jumped on the band wagon. I don’t believe under normal pressures less than 60 psi it’s a problem, plus you can enclose it.
http://www.ehow.com/how_7744362_use-...-air-line.html

JohnnyB
"I do what I do well, but I still like to dabble in what I donít do well"
I just like to build with wood and a means to save money by doing it myself.
I've been building things out of wood for 40 years and I'm still just an amateur.
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post #20 of 24 Old 05-14-2012, 07:50 PM
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I know all you hard core "black iron" types aren't going to like this, but the company where I used to work had the entire place plumbed using nothing more than plain old 3/4" air hose. It came out of the storage tank, through the dryer and into a continuous loop around the ceiling with drop downs at all the machines and work stations. The compressor was an industrial rotary type that shoved 210 psi into a 500 gallon supply tank. We regulated it down from the tank to 120 going into the building and then down to whatever each machine required with regulators at the machines or work stations.

Point being, this jerry rigged system ran 24 hours a day, 6 days a week with no trouble for 20+ years. The hoses never blew. Every now and then a regulator would go bad and need to be replaced because of leaks. The only "black iron" in the system ran from the compressor to the storage tank and then over to the dryer. Everything from the dryer out was just plain old air hose.

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