Farmhouse table please help - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

 2Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 33 Old 12-31-2016, 07:01 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 22
View John De Capua's Photo Album My Photos
Farmhouse table please help

OK so a dew weeks ago I built my wife a new farmhouse table and used yellow pine. Now that the holiday rush is behind us, I went to go finish the table and noticed a big gap in between a board. I drilled another kreg pocket hole but it did not work to bring the board together. What are my options here. If I do decide to tear down and rebuild, how can I avoid this and what type of wood would be best to use for this. Also do you know of any sites or stores that sell decorative strapping to maybe hide it? Here is a picture of the gap
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMAG0496.jpg
Views:	127
Size:	67.0 KB
ID:	270018  

John De Capua is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 33 Old 12-31-2016, 07:27 PM
Junior Member
 
MonsieurBon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 4
View MonsieurBon's Photo Album My Photos
I think we need pictures to understand what you're trying to do. Without seeing the rest of the table it's hard to imagine what forces are at work.

Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk
MonsieurBon is offline  
post #3 of 33 Old 12-31-2016, 07:31 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 5
View twam911's Photo Album My Photos
got an easy fix and looks cool. Get Bar top Epoxy resin and bar top the whole table top. That is what we did. Completely seals the whole top and waterproofs it also. We got our at Lowes $69 for a gallon. We did 2 coats. Also you will want to seal all gaps from underneath. We used painters tape and it still leaked some. On 2nd coat we sealed bottom with silicone that cost $5.
Epoxy is self leveling so make sure everything is level. Also watch youtube videos of how to do. Great ideas on there.
Good luck
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	20161224_114230.jpg
Views:	137
Size:	79.0 KB
ID:	270162  

twam911 is offline  
 
post #4 of 33 Old 12-31-2016, 07:59 PM
Moderator
 
Steve Neul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 18,583
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
If you have a router, set up a straight edge and run a 1/4" straight cut bit between the boards so the bit is cutting both boards. Then use glue and clamps and join the top together. Really the wood should have been straightened with a jointer before you put them together.

Do yourself a favor and put the kreg jig in storage. It really has no place in furniture construction despite how they advertise it.
Steve Neul is online now  
post #5 of 33 Old 12-31-2016, 08:03 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 20,517
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
just a wild guess here ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by John De Capua View Post
OK so a dew weeks ago I built my wife a new farmhouse table and used yellow pine. Now that the holiday rush is behind us, I went to go finish the table and noticed a big gap in between a board. I drilled another kreg pocket hole but it did not work to bring the board together. What are my options here. If I do decide to tear down and rebuild, how can I avoid this and what type of wood would be best to use for this. Also do you know of any sites or stores that sell decorative strapping to maybe hide it? Here is a picture of the gap
I'm guessin' that you used construction grade lumber, possibly, from a box store. It was not fully dry when you assembled it and it shrank creating the gap(s). That's the most difficult wood you could have used on a project like this because it will shrink and cup and curve as it's drying. It would make an OK work bench, but not a very good dining table. You have much to learn about wood, the various types and how it moves in various environments. That is not a criticism, it's just that making wood projects is a complex series of issues beyond just screwing or nailing pieces together.

There are many threads on this site about building "farmhouse tables" you can go over them and benefit from what others have experienced, not always successfully. I'll just say that box store lumber is not straight, not flat and not dry enough and does not make for gapless joinery.

http://r.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=AwrBT...Lh7D.MyUaIgng-

http://r.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=AwrBT...tU2EvYSH97bN4-

To make a gapless joint you'll need a jointer or a straight line jig on your table saw in order to get square and straight edges that will mate together in a seamless joint. If your design calls for a rustic look with some gaps allowed then you can possibly make do with construction grade lumber.
Tennessee Tim likes this.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specfic. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo

Last edited by woodnthings; 12-31-2016 at 08:19 PM.
woodnthings is online now  
post #6 of 33 Old 12-31-2016, 08:30 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 22
View John De Capua's Photo Album My Photos
Thank you. What type of wood would you recommend for the top so that I can fix this.
John De Capua is offline  
post #7 of 33 Old 12-31-2016, 08:32 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 2,008
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
Yellow Pine for a picnic table
White Pine for kitchen table.
White Pine can look good when finished out but it's not good with children. (Too soft).
Most Pine tables are best when used in a rustic decor because they all go rustic pretty fast.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
Toolman50 is offline  
post #8 of 33 Old 12-31-2016, 08:33 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 22
View John De Capua's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by MonsieurBon View Post
I think we need pictures to understand what you're trying to do. Without seeing the rest of the table it's hard to imagine what forces are at work.

Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk

Here is the table in full before the gaps came
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMAG0390.jpg
Views:	130
Size:	54.0 KB
ID:	270170  

John De Capua is offline  
post #9 of 33 Old 12-31-2016, 08:40 PM
Moderator
 
Steve Neul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 18,583
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
How did you attach the breadboard ends? That may have a great deal to do with the top developing cracks in it.
Steve Neul is online now  
post #10 of 33 Old 12-31-2016, 09:02 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 34
View canarywood1's Photo Album My Photos
You don't need jointer to fix that, a glue line rip blade will do the trick, freud makes a good blade for that i'll post a link, or as Steve Neul said a router will work, i would just run the boards on a table with a router, just because i have one and it's fast.

Freud says optimum thickness is 1 inch max, but i've done 2 inches and it came out great.


http://www.acmetools.com/shop/tools/...wMSg#topoftabs

Last edited by canarywood1; 12-31-2016 at 09:10 PM.
canarywood1 is online now  
post #11 of 33 Old 12-31-2016, 09:11 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Central PA
Posts: 450
View TomCT2's Photo Album My Photos
Dear John,

oh. that does not sound so good . . . sorry.

that looks like big box store dimensional lumber - which as has been said above - warps moves twists bends goes crazy because it really is not even close to being stable 'off the shelf'

if you can disassemble to the point you can rip along the 'seam of departures' - then it's just gluing it back together.
however comma but and so on . . . you need to give it at least six months to settle down before you do that - otherwise it may simply 'do it again, Sam'

filling the gap with a resin is another viable / tried&true approach. I'd suggest letting it be for 6 - 12 months and then see what the best solution may be.
TomCT2 is online now  
post #12 of 33 Old 12-31-2016, 09:45 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 34
View canarywood1's Photo Album My Photos
This link will probably help you more than any of us can, like the old saying "a picture is worth a thousand words" and good luck.


https://oldhousecrazy.com/2012/02/26...ad-board-ends/
canarywood1 is online now  
post #13 of 33 Old 12-31-2016, 09:47 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 20,517
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
this ain't a table, it's a door

Same idea when making a table as making a door from planks. Same issues with edges not being straight, and clamping long planks for gluing as in a table top. Here 's my method:
Door Build from 2 Xs and 1/4" ply


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specfic. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo
woodnthings is online now  
post #14 of 33 Old 12-31-2016, 10:50 PM
Sawing against the Wind
 
Tennessee Tim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: God's beautiful hills of Middle Tennessee
Posts: 1,778
View Tennessee Tim's Photo Album My Photos
You have the 2 most common issues going on especially with beginners....MOISTURE and JOINERY.

As wooden things stated there are MANY threads on the 2 issues and both are usually in the same thread due to their relations in understanding building/furniture.

Understanding moisture is equal to understanding joinery...one without the other correctly will destroy the build.

TOO much to retype for it's complex and argued often.
TimPa likes this.

Have a Blessed and Prosperous day in Jesus's Awesome Love, Tim
.......... http://www.tsmfarms.com .......... John 3:16-21 ..........
Reveling God's awesome beauty while creating one of-a-kind flitches and heirlooms.
Tennessee Tim is offline  
post #15 of 33 Old 01-01-2017, 05:09 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 15
View tylerdru90's Photo Album My Photos
It's kind of annoying that there a lot of blogs and what not that show tutorials using construction grade lumber. They also show improper techniques for joining table tops and breadboard ends. I followed some of those tutorials thinking that it was a proper technique for doing things. I'm still a new woodworker, but have been reading these forums everyday for 6 months learning and teaching myself the right way to do things.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
tylerdru90 is offline  
post #16 of 33 Old 01-01-2017, 06:51 PM
Sawing against the Wind
 
Tennessee Tim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: God's beautiful hills of Middle Tennessee
Posts: 1,778
View Tennessee Tim's Photo Album My Photos
[QUOTE=tylerdru90;1545514]It's kind of annoying that there a lot of blogs and what not that show tutorials using construction grade lumber. They also show improper techniques for joining table tops and breadboard ends. I followed some of those tutorials thinking that it was a proper technique for doing things. I'm still a new woodworker, but have been reading these forums everyday for 6 months learning and teaching myself the right way to do things.


That's why you shouldn't believe everything you see on the web....kinda same as everything anyone tells you ..... HINT: SHhhhhh BUT (low voice/whisper) Not everybody knows what they're talking about....even sometimes on here!!!! Just because they can log on and type don't mean their correct!!!

Have a Blessed and Prosperous day in Jesus's Awesome Love, Tim
.......... http://www.tsmfarms.com .......... John 3:16-21 ..........
Reveling God's awesome beauty while creating one of-a-kind flitches and heirlooms.
Tennessee Tim is offline  
post #17 of 33 Old 01-01-2017, 08:06 PM
Moderator
 
Steve Neul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 18,583
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylerdru90 View Post
It's kind of annoying that there a lot of blogs and what not that show tutorials using construction grade lumber. They also show improper techniques for joining table tops and breadboard ends. I followed some of those tutorials thinking that it was a proper technique for doing things. I'm still a new woodworker, but have been reading these forums everyday for 6 months learning and teaching myself the right way to do things.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Construction grade lumber isn't necessarily the devil. I used to manufacture farm tables for an antique dealer to sell. I used SPF 2x4's for everything including the skirt and never had one come back. The main thing is to be pretty picky with the wood you buy and allow for wood movement. It's true if you grab lumber at random you can get some wood which can warp on you but with a little care you can select good wood. The biggest problem with the lumber today is you are likely to get wood with tree bark on it. Most of the lumber I used to use was at least clean.
Steve Neul is online now  
post #18 of 33 Old 01-01-2017, 09:31 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 22
View John De Capua's Photo Album My Photos
Does this blade tequre a straight line jig as well? Also do they work on compact table saws. Excuse my ignorance I am new to wood working. Thank you again.
John De Capua is offline  
post #19 of 33 Old 01-01-2017, 09:41 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 15
View tylerdru90's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by John De Capua View Post
Does this blade tequre a straight line jig as well? Also do they work on compact table saws. Excuse my ignorance I am new to wood working. Thank you again.


I use a straight line rip jig with a regular ripping blade. It does the trick for me. When ripping long boards with any table saw you will need some kind of out feed support to make the cuts safely.



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
tylerdru90 is offline  
post #20 of 33 Old 01-04-2017, 12:05 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 22
View John De Capua's Photo Album My Photos
Hey guys so i have been trying to research based on the information provided by everyone . i am confused on attaching the bread board with m&t. How do i cut this into the vertical boards if they are already attached together? Ivam new to wood working and m&t looks very intimidating. Any other ideas on attaching the bread boards for a novice?
John De Capua is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
farmhouse table wood jdecapua23 General Woodworking Discussion 7 11-15-2016 09:20 PM
Build Your Own Router Table treewok2512 Power Tools & Machinery 19 10-05-2016 10:19 PM
farmhouse table? sirwoodington General Woodworking Discussion 4 08-23-2016 11:12 PM
Add a jig saw table to your table saw pbriggs8 Power Tools & Machinery 5 06-20-2016 01:20 AM
Wolfcraft 6157 router table. dbhost Tool Reviews 2 10-02-2015 08:22 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome