Cribbage Board Questions? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 16 Old 06-10-2010, 10:50 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 72
View dummkauf's Photo Album My Photos
Cribbage Board Questions?

New to the forum. I just started wood working again as i haven't done anything since I was still living at home and had access to my father's garage. It's now been about a decade since I moved out and my garage is getting filled with enough tools to start getting back into this, as well as I seem to have the time for it now too!

So for a first project I decided to make a cribbage board with some wood inlays. Here's where I'm at so far


Just got the inlays glued in, and I still need to glue the main board to the base underneath it.

The main board is made out of cherry, the wood around the edge is maple and the tracks are made out of maple and walnut. I've gotten this far but have some questions on finishing it now.

First, drilling holes. I've seen online a lot of guys making jigs for this, but since I need to holes to go straight down the tracks, I'm not sure if I can really position them dead center on the tracks with a jig. So right now what I am thinking is to draw out where they need to go with pencil(making a grid on the wood basically). Then taking a small punch and making a small hole where the center of each hole needs to go, and then taking the drill press to it(will take forever I know), but I am just curious if anyone has any other suggestions for tackling the hole drilling process.

Also, I left the tracks raised a little bit on purpose. I am going to take a belt sander to get them closer and then shave the whole board down about 1/32" with a planer so I should have a nice smooth surface. However I'm wondering if I should drill my holes before sanding/planing it down so I can correct any chipping when drilling the holes. However I'm not sure if this is a good idea as my planer is a dewalt that has a whole bunch of staggered little teeth(as opposed to the one long blade on older planers) that I am worried might chip the holes when it goes through, but I am not sure. If I were to plane it down and then drill the holes, any tips for drilling the holes without getting any chipping around the holes?

Any other tips/suggestions of finishing this. I am planning on routing the edges, not sure what shape yet, to finish it off. As for finishing it, since I'm not really in a huge rush, I am thinking of rubbing a few coats of pure tung oil in and then trying to do a french polish over that. I've used shellac before but never done a french polish, so figured I'd give it a shot on this project.
dummkauf is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 Old 06-10-2010, 11:26 PM
Scotty D
 
mdntrdr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: IL.
Posts: 4,476
View mdntrdr's Photo Album My Photos
You should be able to drill after, a quality, sharp bit, should reduce tear out.

your finish sanding should take care of any deviation.

That's gonna be a sweet board!

I have fond memorys playing cribage with my Grandfather!

Scott
OH, wait a minute ............Yep!.............That's what he said!

"Like" us on facebook
www.ScottyDsWoodworks.com
Watch Our YouTube Video
mdntrdr is offline  
post #3 of 16 Old 06-11-2010, 08:38 AM
Senior Member
 
Ghidrah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 766
View Ghidrah's Photo Album My Photos
dummkauf,
If you're using a drill press and the table is set at-0- it will drill at 90. Not knowing what the spread is for the peg holes I'd suggest you make an index jig for the drill press, make a template from it and use it as an overlay on the cribbage board.

The template will make future boards easier to make

Work smart not hard!
Never bite the hand that looks dirty
Ghidrah is offline  
post #4 of 16 Old 06-11-2010, 07:13 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 28
View GEMNW's Photo Album My Photos
Crib pegs

That looks like one beautiful board! How about custom pegs to go with it. I use to make pegs all the time for my boards.
I use to go to a lot of garage sales. I picked up a lot of the metal picks that come with nut bowls. They are narrow with a finial on the top and taper on the lower end. I would saw off about 1 1/4" with the finial. Chuck them in a drill and turn them at slow speed against a grinder. Taper about the lower 1/3 until they fit the peg holes. Once you have six of them you can paint a couple of the rings in pairs of red, green. and black. They look good and you can pick them up cheap.
GEMNW is offline  
post #5 of 16 Old 06-12-2010, 12:40 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 72
View dummkauf's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghidrah View Post
dummkauf,
If you're using a drill press and the table is set at-0- it will drill at 90. Not knowing what the spread is for the peg holes I'd suggest you make an index jig for the drill press, make a template from it and use it as an overlay on the cribbage board.

The template will make future boards easier to make
Thanks for the tip. I'm not really planning on making any more boards, and if I do I don't think I'll be doing this type of inlay, thinking maybe just some straight tracks without the curves if I ever do it again.
dummkauf is offline  
post #6 of 16 Old 06-12-2010, 12:42 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 72
View dummkauf's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdntrdr View Post
You should be able to drill after, a quality, sharp bit, should reduce tear out.

your finish sanding should take care of any deviation.

That's gonna be a sweet board!

I have fond memorys playing cribage with my Grandfather!
Thanks for the tip. I just planed the surface down tonight and am planning on drilling them out hopefully on sunday, and the sanding it down and hopefully get it glued to the base sunday as well.
dummkauf is offline  
post #7 of 16 Old 06-12-2010, 01:14 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 72
View dummkauf's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by GEMNW View Post
That looks like one beautiful board! How about custom pegs to go with it. I use to make pegs all the time for my boards.
I use to go to a lot of garage sales. I picked up a lot of the metal picks that come with nut bowls. They are narrow with a finial on the top and taper on the lower end. I would saw off about 1 1/4" with the finial. Chuck them in a drill and turn them at slow speed against a grinder. Taper about the lower 1/3 until they fit the peg holes. Once you have six of them you can paint a couple of the rings in pairs of red, green. and black. They look good and you can pick them up cheap.
Actually I've been thinking about the custom pegs. My father-in-law has one of those shop smith systems that can be setup as a lathe and I was debating making custom pegs out of the scrap wood since I've got cherry, maple, and walnut, I could theoretically make all three sets with different colors and then run a little of my tung oil into them to finish. My only concern is whether or not I can make something that small on a lathe, but I suppose I could try your trick too, cut down some board, put them in a drill and then somehow taking sand paper to them to make the taper.

Is it possible to make pegs like this on a large lathe, or would I need small lathe specially for making small pieces like this?

Here's a pic of where it's at as of tonight

There's some glue on it as I found another tip online for taking care of cracks around inlays online. Just took some sand paper, sanded enough to make saw dust and rubbed the dust into the cracks. I then took some clear super glue to it which gets absorbed into the dust and hardens. Then just sand it down. i tried this on some other scrap, and you can kind of tell that it's been done, but you really need to be looking for it, and in my opinion it looks better than having a space there.

Thanks for all the replies thus far!
dummkauf is offline  
post #8 of 16 Old 06-12-2010, 11:41 AM
Senior Member
 
Ghidrah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 766
View Ghidrah's Photo Album My Photos
Dummkauf,
I thought the same thing when I built my youngest a Mancala board for her birthday, "Just One", never heard of the game never saw an example of the board until I looked it up on the net. I made a nice portable hinged one out of Maple, Oak and Mahogany, oiled it down with Tung oil it came out nice.

She brought it to school to play with friends and all of a sudden I had parents calling for one of a kind Mancala boards. The jigs I made for my little's board and others made for successive boards got mixed and matched to keep all unique.

When the kids were littles and wifey cut hair at home she used to take her customers for walks around the yard, (it's been dubbed visually active) I made an old NE covered bridge for the garden gate post to keep her garden tools out of the weather. Before the summer began I had orders for bird houses, covered bridges and mailboxes.

Work smart not hard!
Never bite the hand that looks dirty
Ghidrah is offline  
post #9 of 16 Old 06-12-2010, 11:41 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 72
View dummkauf's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghidrah View Post
Dummkauf,
I thought the same thing when I built my youngest a Mancala board for her birthday, "Just One", never heard of the game never saw an example of the board until I looked it up on the net. I made a nice portable hinged one out of Maple, Oak and Mahogany, oiled it down with Tung oil it came out nice.

She brought it to school to play with friends and all of a sudden I had parents calling for one of a kind Mancala boards. The jigs I made for my little's board and others made for successive boards got mixed and matched to keep all unique.

When the kids were littles and wifey cut hair at home she used to take her customers for walks around the yard, (it's been dubbed visually active) I made an old NE covered bridge for the garden gate post to keep her garden tools out of the weather. Before the summer began I had orders for bird houses, covered bridges and mailboxes.
Only caveat there is that I don't have the free time to build boards for everyone who may want one which is why this 1 board has taken me so long, and I don't think they'd want to pay what I'd ask, those in-lays were a pain and took forever which means I'd be asking far too much for a cribbage board, though I suppose if someone was willing to pay that much I would have no problem just taking the time to manually mark out the holes either way.

Just say "No"!
dummkauf is offline  
post #10 of 16 Old 06-13-2010, 11:21 AM
Senior Member
 
Ghidrah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 766
View Ghidrah's Photo Album My Photos
For what its worth,

with practice comes confidence, with confidence comes speed.

The learning curve can be hell, early in my framing career one of my employers took on many 1st time projects, (usually custom residential or convoluted and often "A" symmetrical condos). He stated the 1st unit was free and he made his money on the rest.

The learning curve provides the solutions, solutions require practice,

Work smart not hard!
Never bite the hand that looks dirty
Ghidrah is offline  
post #11 of 16 Old 06-14-2010, 01:06 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 72
View dummkauf's Photo Album My Photos
It actually only took me about 30 or 40 minutes to mark out the lines on the board and about an hour to drill them all, which isn't too bad in my opinion. Though I did discover that regular drill bits don't work the best for drilling the holes. Dug out the bits used for drilling counter-sunk holes as those drill bits have a point on the end and taper out to the full width of the bit. I left the counter sink piece off and it worked much better than a regular drill bit, no breakage around the holes at all with the tapered bit. Also managed to get it glued to the base, trimmed the edges down and got them routed. Didn't take any pics of the back, but I started routing out the holes to store a deck of cards and the pegs. I have a left over piece of Walnut that I will be using as a slide door to cover the holes and keep the cards and pegs in, also thinking about sinking some rare earth magnets in somewhere to help hold the drawer/wood piece in place(not sure about the magnets just yet though)

Here's where it is as of tonight


And since I'm still thinking about doing a french polish on this, does anyone have experience polishing a piece like this? I understand that technique for flat pieces, like the top and bottom of the board, but how do you apply it to the curved pieces on the edge that I routed out?
dummkauf is offline  
post #12 of 16 Old 06-14-2010, 08:20 AM
Splinter Cushion
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Huntsville, AL
Posts: 661
View b00kemdano's Photo Album My Photos
Oh wow, that's beautiful! I want to make some cribbage boards, but I haven't been inspired to yet.

Are you going to inlay a skunk? :D
b00kemdano is offline  
post #13 of 16 Old 06-14-2010, 10:10 AM
The Monkey's Uncle
 
Streamwinner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Oceania
Posts: 1,255
View Streamwinner's Photo Album My Photos
Wow, that's nice. Great work.
Streamwinner is offline  
post #14 of 16 Old 06-14-2010, 03:42 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 72
View dummkauf's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by b00kemdano View Post
Oh wow, that's beautiful! I want to make some cribbage boards, but I haven't been inspired to yet.

Are you going to inlay a skunk? :D
Already did :D

You'll notice that the skunk line and double skunk lines are inlaid with Walnut, all the rest of the dividers are Maple. As far as embedding an actual "S", no I am not. I am all done with the inlays at this point. Only things left is to carve out the bottom to hold cards/pegs, sand it all, and start the finish.
dummkauf is offline  
post #15 of 16 Old 06-14-2010, 03:42 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 72
View dummkauf's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Streamwinner View Post
Wow, that's nice. Great work.
Thank you!
dummkauf is offline  
post #16 of 16 Old 06-14-2010, 07:23 PM
Splinter Cushion
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Huntsville, AL
Posts: 661
View b00kemdano's Photo Album My Photos
OIC! I didn't notice till you said it, that's very clever!
b00kemdano is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cribbage Boards Plowboy Project Showcase 7 02-16-2011 07:11 PM
board ft. Rick C. Forestry & Milling 7 05-15-2009 01:21 PM
new to the board from PA SCCTrim Introductions 2 01-02-2009 09:22 AM
new to the board swampHENcalls Introductions 2 12-04-2008 05:37 PM
New to this board 68MHJCs Design & Plans 6 11-15-2008 10:53 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome