Best 7 1/4 circular saw for ripping - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

 
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post #1 of 14 Old 02-27-2009, 06:39 PM Thread Starter
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Best 7 1/4 circular saw for ripping

Does anyone have an opinion as to the best 7 1/4 circular saw for ripping 2x lumber.

I have troupble finding a saw where the blade stays perfectly parallel to the table, which seems necessary for ripping without binding.

Also, it seems the new (for the past few years) thin Cerf blades aggravate the problem of binding when ripping 2x material, or anything for that matter.

Does anyone know where to purchase the thicker tooth carbide blades?
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post #2 of 14 Old 02-27-2009, 08:13 PM
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I have both the Skill and a Black & Decker circular saws. I've used them both for ripping 2x stock with no problems. Which ever saw you get you will need either a home made straight edge or a guide for your particular saw. If you have a saw that lets the blade wobble... through it out NOW! It will get you hurt. Amputation by circular saw is not an approved medical procedure.. If its just a matter of you not being able to hold the saw straight (it can be difficult on some cuts), use a edge guide like I said.

As for regular carbide tipped blades, you can get them in places from Walmart (cheapie) to Rockler (Expensive). It only depends on how much you want to pay for the blade. Check around at Sears, Home Depot, Lowes, 84 Lumber, pretty much anyplace that sells lumber also sells saw blades for just about any normal cutting job you want to do.

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post #3 of 14 Old 02-27-2009, 08:39 PM
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Exclamation Saw Blades for ripping, the scoop!

Both the thin cut Freud Diablo and Marathon at HD and others rip great! Reason being the thinner the blade the less power it takes to plow thru and the less wood it has to remove, simple physics. There is no substitue for a new sharp blade and at $10 or less the 2 blades mentioned are worth it. As already stated a "wobbly blade" is either a bent saw arbor or the blade has lost it's temper from overheating and is not worth a bucket of rusty nails. Which ever is the case...Ditch it! Bad things will happen if U don't. Some everyday building contractors wedge the blade guard up to expose the blade. Do so at our own risk and unless you saw every day with this saw blade exposed, you won't remember and it will bite you! Rigid has a lifetime warranty, but is sold thru HD and their lifespan may be in question, since many HD stores are closing. I own PC 7 1/4, a Skil 8 1/4 and a BD sidewinder 7 1/4. All have their separate purposes. The Skil I got when I was 15 and has been rebuilt once. It has sentimental value. It weighs more than a bag of cement! And make a weird noise but keeps on cuttin. The base plate is critical for ripping with a straight edge guide. Keep your eye out for a discarded storm door as the side pieces of light weight aluminum make great straight edges.
The factory edge of 1/4" masonite makes a low profile straight edge, but often you end up bumping into your clamps if they stick up too high. Some guys make a ripping jig using two pieces of 1/4" or 1/2" sandwiched and make a thru cut on the base when the back cleat is secured on. That way the cut line is the edge of the base exposed after the saw cut and set ups are simple. That's my advice, Bill

One final bit of advice, when ripping lumber, but not plywood necessarily, is to insert a wedge into the kerf as soon as possible to prevent the board from squeezing the back side of the blade as it spins...the greatest cause of kickback, if not the only cause. By using a good rip jig the tendency to twist the saw in the cut to "stay on line" is minimzed, if not eliminated entirely. Set the jig to the marks calmp it or screw it down and.... and Let R Rip! That's my advice, part 2, Bill

More advice part 3: I have found the best saw for ripping to be my wormdrive, you don't have to worry about the weight, which is considerable, because you are resting it on the work, and it's got more Torque because of the gearing, given the same HP and sizeblade. I had to rip some 3" maple and made cuts from opposite sides to meet in the middle. No problem, also a 2 pass cut is preferable to an all at once pass, since it requires less power. That's my advice, part 3,bill ...yea, I know just write a dam book!

Last edited by woodnthings; 02-28-2009 at 11:15 AM.
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post #4 of 14 Old 02-28-2009, 09:32 AM
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I use a Skil worm drive for everything including ripping 2X lumber. It's a beast but, it does the job with no complaining.The blade is a $20.00 Tenryu that I bought locally. Check them out here:
www.tenryu.com/
Great blade and stable, too.

2nd Bill's advice on the guide.
Gene
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post #5 of 14 Old 02-28-2009, 10:04 AM
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Get my blades from the box stores ..
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post #6 of 14 Old 03-07-2009, 05:04 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for your replies

Quote:
Originally Posted by SawDustJack View Post
Get my blades from the box stores ..
I want to thank the people that responded to my question about the best circular saw for ripping.

Mike
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post #7 of 14 Old 03-07-2009, 06:45 PM
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Mike,

I would buy a good quality saw like the Bosch CS20, Makita 5007, etc. These saws will be over $100 but I have a Bosch and my brother has the Makita. Both are very good saws. I would think that any saw comparable to these would also be good.

As the others stated, a good quality ripping blade is necessary. One thing about the thin kerf is that it is a thinner blade and may tend to follow the grain more than the normal kerf. You can try one of each blade and gage your experience. It also depends upon the lumber as to whether the blade will tend to follow the grain.

Also, as already stated, a good straight edge guide is difficult to beat.

Rich (The Yooper)
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Last edited by Rich Aldrich; 03-07-2009 at 06:50 PM.
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post #8 of 14 Old 03-07-2009, 08:23 PM
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I'm with Gene. If you intend to do hundreds of rips, go with a worm drive. They eat wood for breakfast.
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post #9 of 14 Old 03-09-2009, 07:40 PM
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+1 for a worm drive - I love my Rigid 3210.
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post #10 of 14 Old 05-31-2013, 08:18 PM
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I know this is an old thread but...

How many teeth would be good for ripping for a 7-1/4" blade?

The Fredu Diablo blades that were mentioned are available in:

24 Teeth (Framing)

40 Teeth (Finish)

60 Teeth (Ultra Finish)

They don't appear to have different crosscut or rip teeth profiles. So does it matter which tooth count you get for rip cutting?

If you did both crosscut and rip cutting, would you just get the 40 tooth blade?

Studies have shown that having a ladder in the home is more dangerous than having a firearm. That's why I own 10 guns... in case some maniac tries to sneak a ladder into my house...
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post #11 of 14 Old 05-31-2013, 09:34 PM
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you got it right

24 teeth for ripping, 40 T for general cutting, and 60 T for fine crosscut on plywoods... They are not that expensive, but if limited to only 2 which do you do more of? plywood crosscutting or construction lumber ripping? I use a 40T for most everything, but I don't "push" it.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specfic. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo
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post #12 of 14 Old 05-31-2013, 09:49 PM
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Thanks. I might take after yoi and use the 40 tooth blade then.

If i end up doing lots of plywood down the line i might get a 60 tooth later on.

Thanks.

Studies have shown that having a ladder in the home is more dangerous than having a firearm. That's why I own 10 guns... in case some maniac tries to sneak a ladder into my house...
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post #13 of 14 Old 05-31-2013, 11:50 PM
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Stan, this is the only blade I have had on my Makita 5007MG. It makes smooth cuts, both rip and crosscut. Check out the pic of the 8/4 maple tabletop I cut to final size with the combo.

Hope this helps.
Mike
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post #14 of 14 Old 06-01-2013, 08:47 PM
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Thanks for the note and the photo.

Studies have shown that having a ladder in the home is more dangerous than having a firearm. That's why I own 10 guns... in case some maniac tries to sneak a ladder into my house...
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