How to end/return my chair rail and top cap at the window/door casing?? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

 
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post #1 of 17 Old 07-07-2010, 04:26 PM Thread Starter
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Question How to end/return my chair rail and top cap at the window/door casing??

I'm putting up Georgia Pacific 4x8 panels that are approx 3/8" thick. I'm going to put up chair rail and a 1 1/2" thick top cap. I'll also prime and paint this for an indoor application.

My question is, how do I end the chair rail and top cap at the window and door casings? Here's a couple pieces of scrap to show the profile but I'm not sure what looks better (one is mitered with a return and the other is butted up to the casing). As you can see, the butted chair is proud of the window/door casing. What are my options??

UPDATE::: the beadboard will be a different color then the trim.

Thanks!!



Last edited by RickDel; 07-07-2010 at 05:13 PM.
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post #2 of 17 Old 07-07-2010, 04:44 PM
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I would stop the cap 1/2" shy of the casing.........don't run over it.

And keep the 45deg return on the rail.

Missread...........bump the cap.

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OH, wait a minute ............Yep!.............That's what he said!

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post #3 of 17 Old 07-07-2010, 04:59 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the quick reply.... I just ran up and took a pic of the molding 1/2" short of the casing, but I don't think it looks right because the corner of the beardboard is exposed. What do you think?

Additionally, I cut one piece of beadboard 1/4" short, so that will make it look even worse!! (I was thinking it would be covered, so I didn't worry about at the time.... NOW IT SEEMS LIKE A BIG DEAL!!)

Thanks Again?


Last edited by RickDel; 07-07-2010 at 05:04 PM.
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post #4 of 17 Old 07-07-2010, 05:02 PM
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You are correct sir................You had it right in your first pic.

Goes 2 sho what I know

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post #5 of 17 Old 07-07-2010, 05:10 PM Thread Starter
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haha!!!! Good reply!! Honestly, this one little thing that I'm sure most carpenters would think is soooo easy is driving me CRAZY!!!! I can't find any pictures and have NO IDEA what's right or wrong!!

Oh, and I forgot to mention the beadboard and trim will be different colors.

Thanks!!

Last edited by RickDel; 07-07-2010 at 05:14 PM.
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post #6 of 17 Old 07-07-2010, 05:36 PM
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I don't like to cut trim short. If the beadboard is set back from the face of the casing, cut the trim off at 90 degrees and then cut a 45 degree bevel down the face. So, looking at it, the trim butts tight and the edge is beveled to meet the casing .

I've done this several times and it actually looks pretty darn good. It sure beats mitering a return, which depending on the detail will leave a void looking at it against the casing.






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post #7 of 17 Old 07-07-2010, 05:51 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Cabinetman!!

So, you would continue to overlap the top cap, as shown in my pictures, and only bevel the chair rail, right? If so, I'll cut a few scraps and see what that looks like.

That would also alleviate my different paint (color) issues in the space between the chair rail and window casing.

Thanks for the suggestion!!!
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post #8 of 17 Old 07-07-2010, 05:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickDel View Post

So, you would continue to overlap the top cap, as shown in my pictures, and only bevel the chair rail, right? If so, I'll cut a few scraps and see what that looks like.

That would also alleviate my different paint (color) issues in the space between the chair rail and window casing.

Thanks for the suggestion!!!

IMO, that top cap looks a bit much with the chair rail. You may not need it. I would see what the rail looks like without it.






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post #9 of 17 Old 07-07-2010, 06:19 PM
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I'd go with 5/8 or 3/4" flat stock for the cap and bull nose it. 45 the end of the CR and and glue a 45 face section to it to finish it off.
Keep the CR flush to the top of the paneling and let the cap overhang the CR by 1/2 or 5/8. You'll end up with a cap that's anywhere from 1-1/4" to 2" wide.

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post #10 of 17 Old 07-07-2010, 06:55 PM
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Hi,
Whats the difference in the reveal of the beadboard to the casing? Doesn't look like much. You could also replace the casing with a thicker profile or add a backband around the outside edge of your casing to create a thicker profile. Then you could butt the chair rail into the casing.

James
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post #11 of 17 Old 07-07-2010, 06:58 PM
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You could run 7/8" square back band around the door casing, then run your chair rail and cap straight into it. No projection to deal with, and back band really enhances the look of your casing. You could buy it, or just make your own tailored to accommodate the width of your cap.

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post #12 of 17 Old 07-07-2010, 07:58 PM Thread Starter
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That 'back band' idea is GREAT!!

Is this an example of what you're talking about:


Do you guys have any advice on making it? How wide should it be for 3 1/2" casing? And how thick can it be if my casing is 3/4" thick? (will it look out of place if it's 1/4" thicker then the rest of the window casing?

Also, since I'll have to remove some of the beadboard I've already installed, how should I remove it? I have a Fein Multimaster, but not sure if that's overkill.

I really like to continue to use the top cap I've already made, so if I do, can I'll still overlap it over the window/door casing. Is this acceptable?

To summarize:

I could make a back band around the window casing equil or just proud of the chair rail. Then butt the chair rail and overlap the top cap with a mitered return. What do you guys think??

THANK YOU ALL VERY MUCH!!
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post #13 of 17 Old 07-07-2010, 08:21 PM
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I think it would look best with the top cap turned upside down.

Definitely run both all the way to the casing. As Cabinet man says, bevel the part that sticks past the door casing.

Question. How high will the chair rail be off the floor? You are not going to use the full width of the 4' are you?

George
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post #14 of 17 Old 07-07-2010, 08:54 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Question. How high will the chair rail be off the floor? You are not going to use the full width of the 4' are you?
Hmmm, I'm not feeling very confident about what might come next, but Yes, 48" high (plus chair and cap). I'm trying to make a nursery like this:


Do you guys mean bevel the top cap like this?

Last edited by RickDel; 07-07-2010 at 09:09 PM.
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post #15 of 17 Old 07-07-2010, 09:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickDel View Post
That 'back band' idea is GREAT!!

Is this an example of what you're talking about:


Do you guys have any advice on making it? How wide should it be for 3 1/2" casing? And how thick can it be if my casing is 3/4" thick? (will it look out of place if it's 1/4" thicker then the rest of the window casing?

Also, since I'll have to remove some of the beadboard I've already installed, how should I remove it? I have a Fein Multimaster, but not sure if that's overkill.

I really like to continue to use the top cap I've already made, so if I do, can I'll still overlap it over the window/door casing. Is this acceptable?

To summarize:

I could make a back band around the window casing equil or just proud of the chair rail. Then butt the chair rail and overlap the top cap with a mitered return. What do you guys think??

THANK YOU ALL VERY MUCH!!
Yes a back band such as you have in your example. 1/4" reveal to the casing is ok, you want to have a reveal as compared to flush to hide the joint between the casing & added back band. You should make it thick enough to have a slight reveal where your chair rail meets the back band. Maybe route a small round over or small profile on the top edge that faces towards the casing. As far as width you could do a few examples to see what you like the look of best. Then you could just butt your chair rail into the back band.

James
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post #16 of 17 Old 07-07-2010, 09:27 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlord View Post
Yes a back band such as you have in your example. 1/4" reveal to the casing is ok, you want to have a reveal as compared to flush to hide the joint between the casing & added back band. You should make it thick enough to have a slight reveal where your chair rail meets the back band. Maybe route a small round over or small profile on the top edge that faces towards the casing. As far as width you could do a few examples to see what you like the look of best. Then you could just butt your chair rail into the back band.
That is really GREAT advice!!!!!

Okay, so maybe put a routed edge on the back band, but does the casing need any routing too in order to get a good look? Also, can I just rip down some poplar to use for the back band?

I can't thank you guys enough. I've literally been thinking about this problem for days, and in less then an hour after posting this you guys gave me a great solution!! Thank You!!!!
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post #17 of 17 Old 07-07-2010, 09:39 PM
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Routing he casing is up to you, but if it has a pretty square edge then you can leave it alone. Popular is fine. I would ease the outside edge of your back band so there are no sharp edges. You can use a sanding block or an 1/8" round over bit. If you use the round over make sure that the reveal to the chair rail is more than your back band or it will show a divit. But you can just soften the edge with sandpaper.

James
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Last edited by jlord; 07-07-2010 at 09:43 PM.
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