Help Cutting Acute Angles - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

 
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post #1 of 10 Old 12-26-2007, 09:51 PM Thread Starter
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Help Cutting Acute Angles

Hi,

I was searching this board and CT boards where I swear I read a thread about setting up a miter saw and/or table saw for cutting angles like 66 degrees, etc. I had a guy working for me who did my finish carpentry, but he is no longer with me. I have no idea how he set up the saw, and I am in a bind.

The application is cutting panel moulding to make wall frames up a stairway. And the top and side of the stairway will receive a triangle.

Can I purchase a table saw sled (i.e. Kreg) to be used as a jig?

Thanks!

Richie
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post #2 of 10 Old 12-27-2007, 11:02 AM
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Richie-C, a 66 degree angle is made up of two smaller complementary angles, whether inside or outside. I have several miter saws and everything from 45 degress left/right down to 0 (crosscut) works for me regardless of the molding or the type of corner. Crown. Trim. Baseboard. Even the very subtle angles needed to follow along a slight bend in a wall or completely around a rounded corner. Perhaps I'm not understanding your question correctly.

Don't force it. Use a bigger hammer.
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post #3 of 10 Old 12-27-2007, 01:30 PM
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Richie; Can you get specific? I think I know what u r trying to say. Remember a miterbox is ALREADY at 90 degrees to the blade, therefore if you need a more obtuse angle than the box you can make a block that is square against the fence and run your molding PARRALLEL to the blade and then make your cuts. Man I hope that made sense to you :}
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post #4 of 10 Old 12-27-2007, 02:01 PM
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Richie, the cuts you're talking about are the bane of my existence!

You are talking about the trapazoids going up stairs right? there's a 40 degree and the other is I think a 66 as you said.

We put the saw on a 45 and then believe it or not hold the piece of molding out and away from the fence (still sitting flat on the deck) and free-hand the cuts. Yes it's dangerous, yes you have to hold on and stay focused. Once you have the correct angle though you can make a jig out of scrap MDF or such, with the correct angle and then safely rest the piece against that.

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post #5 of 10 Old 12-27-2007, 05:34 PM Thread Starter
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Endgrain, Joesdad described exactly what I was trying to-the crazy stair boxes!

So, I understand the method, but I was hoping there was a safer, more accurate way to do it! I remember creating a jig for the table saw, but If there is a way I can use my mitre saw, I would rather do it that way.

If I mark my angle on the piece of molding and place a block on the fence as Skymaster said I should be able to free hand it
then create a jig.

Thanks!
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post #6 of 10 Old 12-27-2007, 08:02 PM
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Richie; No freehand needed :} with the block you are able to use the scale on the miterbox to figure ur angle and keep a list of setings to get ur angles :] Just remember that the angles needed are TOTAL angles therefore 1/2 of that is ur miter
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post #7 of 10 Old 12-27-2007, 09:53 PM
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Yes. Avoid the freehand thing as best you can, I'm one of those knuckleheads that takes the guard of my miter saws too so maybe my advice isn't that good. I only know what works for me.

Intellectuals solve problems, geniuses prevent them.
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post #8 of 10 Old 12-27-2007, 10:42 PM
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Joesdad; WHOA !!!!!!!!!! You want this to work?????????
THAT is a whole nuther issue :}:}:}:}

Hope ya had a good HO HO HO Happy new year to all
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post #9 of 10 Old 12-27-2007, 10:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-C View Post
Endgrain, Joesdad described exactly what I was trying to-the crazy stair boxes!

So, I understand the method, but I was hoping there was a safer, more accurate way to do it! I remember creating a jig for the table saw, but If there is a way I can use my mitre saw, I would rather do it that way.

If I mark my angle on the piece of molding and place a block on the fence as Skymaster said I should be able to free hand it
then create a jig.

Thanks!
Thanks Richie-C. I figured I wasn't at all on the same wave length. Somehow, I just couldn't be that smart and you sure couldn't be that clueless.

I just use a protractor to scribe a line at the required angle and then eyeball cuts like that on a scrap piece at 90 degrees, check the fit and then adjust accordingly. Then, I use the scrap piece to align the good piece underneath to the blade which remains at 90 degrees and then make the cut. Naturally, all fingers are located and accounted for twice before the saw is started. Making a jig is no doubt the best way to go if you do this regularly.

Well, I had my laugh for the day. Thanks for being kind, Richie-C.

Don't force it. Use a bigger hammer.
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post #10 of 10 Old 12-29-2007, 08:59 PM
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A real safe way to cut accurate angles over 45 is to use a panel cutter on a table saw. You can tack a backer and support block in place and slide the cut through. I have made up two panel cutters that do nothing but left and right 45 degree mitres. A perfect picture frame every time and great for mitred panel doors.
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Last edited by Youngman; 12-30-2007 at 12:12 AM.
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