Cheap planer consequences - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

 
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post #1 of 6 Old 03-17-2012, 03:43 AM Thread Starter
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Cheap planer consequences

Hello,
I review machinery to my future shope. I will use on my own purpose to finish my house. I am planing to build doors, 15, and floring boards 2500sq feet, kitchen.
I found that Dewalt 735 is very good tools. But what if I would like to save some money and buy cheaper one. What are direct consequences of buying cheaper planer? I understand that cheaper will be lower quality and is not going to be last that long. But maybe it is not that important to me.
How does cheaper planer works? Would any of them work form me? What can you recommend for me?
Thanks
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post #2 of 6 Old 03-17-2012, 05:01 AM
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If you want to drop down under $400 the Ridgid and the Dewalt 734 would be my choices. There won't be a big difference in quality, you are going to have to sand anyway. If it is a one of project I would probably get the Ridgid, if you plane to continue to use it I would go ahead and spend the money on the 735 and I would get the 735X off Amazon, which has an extra set of knives and the outfeed tables for $586

http://www.amazon.com/DeWalt-DW735X-Two-Speed-Planer-Package/dp/B003OX9KME/ref=sr_du_1_map?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1331971244&sr=1-1
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post #3 of 6 Old 03-17-2012, 09:00 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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I would be thinking more like cast iron, stationary Heavy Duty 3 Hp like a Jet 15" or Grizzly, Rockwell. That's a lot of planing...2500 sq ft is many more times lineal ft.
Check Craig's List for your area or buy new.

Last edited by woodnthings; 03-17-2012 at 03:54 PM.
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post #4 of 6 Old 03-17-2012, 09:54 AM
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I use a inexpensive 12" Delta planer that sits atop my Grizzly, piggy back. I bought to have a small planer to use at job sites. It is light weight and cheap ( about $200), but to my surprise produced a very smooth surface. It's is not a workhorse and I only remove small amounts of wood with it. That's why it sits on top of the Grizzly because the Griz does not do well at removing a very small amount of wood and can leave feed roller marks. If I need to remove just a tiny amount I use the Delta.

I'm not sure the Delta wood survive the work you have planned for it.

Bret
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post #5 of 6 Old 03-17-2012, 11:33 AM
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A planer alone isn't going to allow you to flatten and straighten stock and that will be especially important when milling lumber for doors. You need a jointer, too. Building 15 doors is quite a task but beyond the logistics of doing the proper joinery, making jambs and installing hardware, is the issue of finding enough high quality lumber. Doors have to be reasonably flat and straight and stay that way. Most modern doors are not solid wood, although, they appear to be. They are made from stave core lumber and veneered for the reasons I've stated.

It's difficult for us to know what level of standards you want to aspire to, what your woodworking skills are and what you are looking for in terms of design, function and appearance. There is far more to what you are proposing than buying some tools and flipping a switch. I've built hundreds of homes and many times the owners wanted to do some of the work themselves. All but a rare few have been overwhelmed with basic tasks like painting. Constructing some of the millwork would have been out of the question.

Not knowing exactly what you want, how much time and money you can invest, you can look at something like pre-finished hardwood flooring. You can buy many different species of strip flooring for $3 per square foot or less. If you buy hardwood lumber, it's random length and width and in the rough. It's hard to find it for $3 sq.ft. and that's just the beginning. You still have to go through the milling process, cut tongues and grooves both on the edges and ends, relieve the backs, install, sand and finish, all of which can take weeks, maybe months, if you can work on it full time and have the necessary equipment, space and knowledge.

I'm not trying to be discouraging, just pointing up the realities of what you propose. You may have unlimited time, resources, money and don't have to meet loan deadlines, building permit limits or have to live in a construction site. If you are looking to save time and money, you might want to crunch the numbers and look at things from a practical view point.
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post #6 of 6 Old 03-17-2012, 05:55 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammer1 View Post
A planer alone isn't going to allow you to flatten and straighten stock and that will be especially important when milling lumber for doors. You need a jointer, too. Building 15 doors is quite a task but beyond the logistics of doing the proper joinery, making jambs and installing hardware, is the issue of finding enough high quality lumber. Doors have to be reasonably flat and straight and stay that way. Most modern doors are not solid wood, although, they appear to be. They are made from stave core lumber and veneered for the reasons I've stated.

It's difficult for us to know what level of standards you want to aspire to, what your woodworking skills are and what you are looking for in terms of design, function and appearance. There is far more to what you are proposing than buying some tools and flipping a switch. I've built hundreds of homes and many times the owners wanted to do some of the work themselves. All but a rare few have been overwhelmed with basic tasks like painting. Constructing some of the millwork would have been out of the question.

Not knowing exactly what you want, how much time and money you can invest, you can look at something like pre-finished hardwood flooring. You can buy many different species of strip flooring for $3 per square foot or less. If you buy hardwood lumber, it's random length and width and in the rough. It's hard to find it for $3 sq.ft. and that's just the beginning. You still have to go through the milling process, cut tongues and grooves both on the edges and ends, relieve the backs, install, sand and finish, all of which can take weeks, maybe months, if you can work on it full time and have the necessary equipment, space and knowledge.

I'm not trying to be discouraging, just pointing up the realities of what you propose. You may have unlimited time, resources, money and don't have to meet loan deadlines, building permit limits or have to live in a construction site. If you are looking to save time and money, you might want to crunch the numbers and look at things from a practical view point.

I know that it is a lot of work! I will not do everything at once. I will leave flooring for next year. I can do them in steps. Now I leave in apartment and it happened to me I needed to do some work and I was with out tools. I think that in case where I will have house in country side it would be necessary have some tools. So I think that soon or later It will have to buy some tools so maybe I will buy them now and use in my house.
Wood supply is another case. I have tell you that I am moving back to Poland! I live now in WA sate but soon moving back home. In Poland we do not use wood for construction so it is abundant. I am planning to use frued tools to make doors with out additional moldings.
I think that my skills will handle this work as I have mechanical high school degree with mechanical machining as core of the program, and mechanical engineering degree as well as experience.
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