biscuit joiner - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 16 Old 07-15-2010, 08:17 PM Thread Starter
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biscuit joiner

I hav a pretty comprihensive shop put together but i need biscuit joiner i dont know that i will use it that much but I a about to build a desk and a table any suggestions on a reasonably priced tool
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post #2 of 16 Old 07-15-2010, 08:34 PM
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I have built a few desks and many tables........never found a need for a biscuit joiner.

If I was ever to buy one, it would be Porter Cable.

Scott
OH, wait a minute ............Yep!.............That's what he said!
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post #3 of 16 Old 07-15-2010, 09:00 PM
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I find them very useful in a limited set of circumstances. Years (many years) ago, I had an Elu. I have also used a Lamello. But biscuit joiners are fairly simple machines. A few years ago I picked up a Ryobi cheap at The Borg, and it has served quite sufficiently on the dozen or so occasions that I've used it.
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post #4 of 16 Old 07-15-2010, 11:48 PM
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I have the Makita. I like it, it does what a biscuit joiner is supposed to do. I'd stick with any of the bigger brands and you won't go wrong.
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post #5 of 16 Old 07-16-2010, 02:06 AM
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Had one (PC Brand) and sold it. It did not do what I expected it to do. (Keep the boards in a glued up panel even so that a wide belt sanding was not necessary.)

I find that dowels do a much better job of keeping panels flat.

Use the right tool for the job.

Rich (Tilting right)
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post #6 of 16 Old 07-16-2010, 12:10 PM
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I have the HF model because It's a seldom used tool and it works OK. Problem with any of them I think is the slot can easily be made larger then needed if you don't push exactly straight forward. I also bought the Craftsman mini biscuit joiner just because it was on sale and I didn't have one.

Yes I have a problem just like allot of you do.
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post #7 of 16 Old 07-16-2010, 12:51 PM
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Had one (PC Brand) and sold it. It did not do what I expected it to do. (Keep the boards in a glued up panel even so that a wide belt sanding was not necessary.)

I find that dowels do a much better job of keeping panels flat.

Getting a dowel alignment could be difficult. A full spline is faster and more predictable. The best method for alignment is clamps and cauls.






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post #8 of 16 Old 07-16-2010, 12:54 PM
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I hav a pretty comprihensive shop put together but i need biscuit joiner i dont know that i will use it that much but I a about to build a desk and a table any suggestions on a reasonably priced tool

WELCOME TO THE FORUM

I'm not going to suggest you run out and spend money on a biscuit joiner. I will propose a question. What would you use in place of a biscuit joiner? Suppose there was no such thing as a biscuit joiner...what would you do?






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post #9 of 16 Old 07-16-2010, 02:44 PM
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I use a Dewalt biscuit joiner that I've had for about 6 years. It works very well and it cost around $60 at the time. I use it quite a bit and bought it because dowels were a royal pain to deal with.

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post #10 of 16 Old 07-16-2010, 03:03 PM
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WELCOME TO THE FORUM

I'm not going to suggest you run out and spend money on a biscuit joiner. I will propose a question. What would you use in place of a biscuit joiner? Suppose there was no such thing as a biscuit joiner...what would you do?

I would glue the pieces together and make my wife stand on the joint for 24 hours. If she moved, I would crack the whip. She would learn fast.
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post #11 of 16 Old 07-19-2010, 10:44 PM
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I have the DeWalt but if I had it to do over again I think I would go with the PC. The mechanism is a bit different and I sometimes have trouble getting the DeWalt to exactly center the grooves. Then again, I'm fussy!

If you only plan on occasional use, the Ryobi http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...atalogId=10053 and one of the Craftsman cutters http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_1...o=3&blockType= appear to be the same and get good reviews. They are much less $$.

Bill
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post #12 of 16 Old 07-20-2010, 01:23 AM
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Getting a dowel alignment could be difficult. A full spline is faster and more predictable. The best method for alignment is clamps and cauls.

A-Men, Mike.

However I use a secret jig made from common parts found in a woodworking store. The alignment is rarely off by more than 1/128".

Use the right tool for the job.

Rich (Tilting right)
Huntington Beach, California
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post #13 of 16 Old 07-20-2010, 04:54 AM
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I have the Freud. I rarely use it. I thought I would but was wrong. I wish I would have bought a Kreg jig instead. I know that's apples to oranges, but if I am just throwing something together quick I think I would have prefered pocket screws. The Freud is OK though. It works.
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post #14 of 16 Old 07-20-2010, 09:03 AM
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However I use a secret jig made from common parts found in a woodworking store. The alignment is rarely off by more than 1/128".

Maybe keep it a secret. I've never actually measured any differential if any. With a good glue up I can't feel any offset with my finger.

If there is any offset, the high side has to be taken down to the low side (usually top and bottom). That changes the transverse plane of the high side unless that milling happens across the section. Doing that changes the dimension of the total thickness, especially if the backside has to get milled. Then the whole piece has been reduced by whatever came of the top and the bottom.

If it's just at the joint there stands the possibility that the rest of the board across its width will vary.






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post #15 of 16 Old 07-20-2010, 10:47 AM
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When I 1st began using my BJ, (Dewalt, 1990 or 91 still have and use the same ) I had constant problems with alignment. As I spent time trying to figure out what I was doing wrong, I improved the results to the point where I no longer have issues worth mentioning.

Finish lumber from the Lumb.Yd, IMO, has a much higher quality and quantity than the big box stores. That said there is still much lacking in the product supplied, most is mass produced plain sawn, albeit kept under cover it's not climate controlled. The mill cutters get dull and misaligned and it shows with scalloping, chipping and surface waves.

Minus using an unsafe tool which is also human error, all problems can be traced back to human error which accounts for most or all of the problems with glue ups and in particular BJing. Most stock is crowned, hooked and uneven in dimension. If one assumes otherwise and just cuts up the stock for a glue up, regardless of diligence in the BJing process there will be dissatisfaction with the results.

The stock requires further milling to make it suitable for jointing and glue ups. Uniform dimensions and crown minimization by ripping pieces into manageable units, surface planing for uniform thickness, edge jointing to square the sides up.

For me once I began making the biscuit cuts with the stock elevated off the work bench or extended over the edge the rest of my inconsistent mismatch problems disappeared. I had wondered if I or the table was forcing the jointer to tilt ever so slightly as I pushed the blade into the stock. It was either or both, I never figured out, it was an inconsistent error, none-the-less it stopped once I removed the possibility.

Its wonderful when a large piece of lumber can be milled and utilized, but that doesn't happen often with new wood.

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post #16 of 16 Old 07-20-2010, 01:02 PM
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btw, you can get a biscuit slot cutter for router (table) use also. choose a biscuit jointer that has a good registry with the wood (slight pins or rubber) to eliminate slipping during the cut. i use mine (makita) often in the contracting business - one more great tool for your arsenal.
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